Marcus Bells Three Camera Bags And Whats In Them

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Marcus Bell is experienced and prepared. As Bruce Dorn has said on numerous occasions, "Luck favors the prepared." And so it is Bell's motto also. He uses three small-sized bags of varying age, including what he calls a "bum bag," which he wears about his waist most of the day.

Marcus Bell is experienced and prepared. As Bruce Dorn has said on numerous occasions, "Luck favors the prepared." And so it is Bell's motto also. He uses three small-sized bags of varying age, including what he calls a "bum bag," which he wears about his waist most of the day.

Working with two camera bodies all day gives Marcus Bell the flexibility to change viewpoints quickly so that shots like this fleeting moment don't get missed.

MAIN BAG

1. Spare batteries

2. Air brush and lens cleaning cloth

3. Two Canon EOS 5Ds with two main lenses (28-70mm f/2.8 and 85mm f/1.2)

4. Epson P4000 downloader, carried in pocket

5. Point-and-shoot 8MP camera for backup (surprisingly, some of the album images get made with this camera)

6. Digital flashmeter

7. 70-200mm f/2.8 lens for ceremony

8. Flashlight for looking through the three bags

9. Stain stick and cloth to remove virtually any stain from the wedding dress

10. Breath freshener ("a courtesy," he says)

WAIST BAG (WORN THE ENTIRE DAY)

2. Crochet hook (sometimes needed to help a bride fasten her dress)

3. Arctic Butterfly (battery-powered sensor brush that is used to remove dust)

4. Small battery-powered, handheld video light

5. Extension tube for close-ups

6. More spare batteries

7. 30GB worth ofcards (4GB each)

BACKUP BAG

1. EOS 1D Mark II

3. Tele-extender (rarely used)

4. More spare batteries

5. Charger for batteries

6. Timetable and driving directions

backgrounds beautifully out of focus and, when used wide open, provides a sumptuously thin band of focus, which is ideal for isolating image details.

Another popular choice is the 85mm (f/1.2 for Canon; f/1.4 or f/1.8 for Nikon), which is a short telephoto with exceptional sharpness. This lens gets used frequently at receptions because of its speed and ability to throw backgrounds out of focus, depending on the subject-to-camera distance. It is one of Marcus Bell's preferred lenses for the majority of his wedding day coverage.

facing page, top left—With an EE 70-200mmf/2.8L USM lens on his Canon EOS ID, Marc Weisbergshot wide open at ISO 100. Tins might be the poster for Southern California weddings. above and facing page, bottom—Today, wide-angles are used as much as any other lens and mostly for dramatic effect. Both images here are by J.B. Salle e. The fire-truck image is titled They Call Me a Fireman. To create it, a 10.5mm f/2.8 Nikkor DXfisheye lens was used very close for optimal distortion at the frame edges. A balanced fill-flash was fired to give the bride and groom some main light. For the image of the bride in the art museu m, titled The $2.3 Million Dollar Bride, Sallee used a 17mm f/2.8 and carefully aligned his verticals and horizontals to minimize distortion. left—Telephoto lenses compress the perspective of the scene as is seen here. Tlje bands of light and shadow look right on top of one another and the subjects stand out boldly from the background. This image by Cal landau was made with a Canon EOS 10D and 70—200mm lens at the 200mm setting. Tlje image was made on a landing strip at a small airport. Exposu re was Viooo second at f/5.0.

Normal Lens. One should not forget about the 50mm f/1.2 or f/1.4 "normal" lens for digital photography. With a 1.4x focal-length factor, for example, that lens becomes a 70mm f/1.2 or f/1.4 lens that is ideal for portraits or groups, especially in low light. And the close-focusing distance of this lens makes it an extremely versatile wedding lens.

Sensor Size. Most digital imaging sensors are smaller than the full-size lxl.5-inch (24x36mm) 35mm frame. While the chip size does not necessarily affect image qual-

above—Wife of J.B. Sallee, DeEtte made this fantastic image, entitled Joy Ride, with a Nikon D2X and 80-200mm f/2.8 lens at the 175mm setting. The digital sensors in today's DSLRs are so incredibly sharp that you almost need to apply some minor diffusion to every image. left— Joe Photo made this delightful image with his Nikon D1X and 17mm f/2.8 lens at 1/6ooo second at f/2.8. Because of the focal length factor, the 17mm lens functioned like a 25mm wide-angle.

above—Wife of J.B. Sallee, DeEtte made this fantastic image, entitled Joy Ride, with a Nikon D2X and 80-200mm f/2.8 lens at the 175mm setting. The digital sensors in today's DSLRs are so incredibly sharp that you almost need to apply some minor diffusion to every image. left— Joe Photo made this delightful image with his Nikon D1X and 17mm f/2.8 lens at 1/6ooo second at f/2.8. Because of the focal length factor, the 17mm lens functioned like a 25mm wide-angle.

ity or file size, it does affect lens focal length. With sensors smaller than 24x36mm, lenses get effectively longer.

This is not usually a problem where telephotos and telephoto zooms are concerned, but when your expensive wide-angles or wide-angle zooms become significantly less wide on the digital camera body, it can be somewhat frustrating. For example, with a 1.4x focal-length factor, a 17mm lens becomes a 24mm lens.

There are several DSLRs from Canon with full-size 24x36mm imaging chips, meaning that there is no change to your lenses' effective focal lengths. Camera manufacturers who have committed to chip sizes that are smaller than full-frame 35 mm have started to introduce lens lines specifically designed for digital imaging. The circle of coverage (the area of focused light falling on the film plane or digital-imaging chip) is smaller and more collimated to compensate for the smaller chip size. Thus, the lenses can be made more economically and smaller in size, yet still offer as wide a range of focal lengths as traditional lenses.

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