Inward Lighting Techniques

You may not have heard of this term before, it's a name I have given to an alternative lighting angle which I've been experimenting with since 2007.

I'm always experimenting with all manner of things photographic and I've found that by turning my flashguns inwards, facing towards me and in the wrong direction the background immediately behind a subject can be intentionally underexposed. It works by using the very 'edge' of the beam angle.

fig. 6.59 fig. 6.60 In Fig. 6.59 you can clearly see the coral background about 8 cm behind the fish fin. I used one flashgun and after about 20 attempts I managed to find the edge of my Inon Z220 (with diffuser fitted) flash beam. Nikon D300, 60 mm macro lens, f19 at 1/250th sec, ISO 200.

fig. 6.61 I used the same techniques in this example. The reef wall was no more than 10 cm behind the subject.
fig. 6.62 Screen-print.

fig. 6.63 This technique works with all focal length of lenses. I recognised the potential with two formations of table corals. One in the foreground and the other, a similar shape, in the background. When I spotted this on a reef wall in Menjangan, Bali, the late afternoon sun was setting at a perfect angle and with a calm surface, Snell's window was also quite pronounced. The challenge was to flash light the foreground and leave the background in a stark silhouette. I recognised that the two circular shapes of the corals would also complement each other. Look top left at the screen print above and you will see my progression in attempting to achieve the desired effect. My flash positions were pointing towards my face with the edge of the beam cutting just in front of my dome port to illuminate the immediate foreground. Nikon D200,10.5 mm fisheye, f11 at 250th sec, ISO 100, two Inon flashguns on full power.

fig. 6.63 This technique works with all focal length of lenses. I recognised the potential with two formations of table corals. One in the foreground and the other, a similar shape, in the background. When I spotted this on a reef wall in Menjangan, Bali, the late afternoon sun was setting at a perfect angle and with a calm surface, Snell's window was also quite pronounced. The challenge was to flash light the foreground and leave the background in a stark silhouette. I recognised that the two circular shapes of the corals would also complement each other. Look top left at the screen print above and you will see my progression in attempting to achieve the desired effect. My flash positions were pointing towards my face with the edge of the beam cutting just in front of my dome port to illuminate the immediate foreground. Nikon D200,10.5 mm fisheye, f11 at 250th sec, ISO 100, two Inon flashguns on full power.

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