Ideas

• Start playing with this technique just after sunrise or towards dusk when light levels are quite low. This enables a medium aperture of f8 or f5.6 to complement a slow shutter speed around 1/8th and 1/15th sec.

• Start shooting your dive buddy and pan your housing as they swim along beside you. Press the shutter, review the results, bracket apertures and vary the speed of your pan. You never know what results you might get but it's fun, it's different and just when you think it's too dark to do wide angle the amusement begins.

• Progress to moving subjects such as fish and, again, use a panning motion to track their movement whilst you press the shutter.

• I also use a zooming technique as well as panning. I will start with my Nikon 12 mm—24 mm on the 24 mm setting, follow a subject, press the shutter and for the brief moment the shutter is open I will zoom back my lens from the 24 mm narrow end to the 12 mm wide angle lens.

• Sometimes it can look like an ugly mess but at other times it can really surprise and impress you and others.

• Next time you're photo-diving give it a try.

FIG. 9.25 Was taken in similar circumstances with a 4 second shutter speed at f16, ISO 200.
FIG. 9.26 My settings were 1/8th sec at f6.7, ISO 100, Nikon 10.5 mm fisheye lens. I took this image before the Tokina fisheye zoom was released. Given the option my first choice of lens for these techniques would be Tokina followed closely by Nikon 12—24 mm for the flexibility of the zoom.

FIG. 9.27 Motion blur and using slow shutter speeds will be either a love or hate relationship. I'm the former; I love the creative possibilities and the thrill of having no idea whatsoever how they will appear on my LCD screen! This shot shows the schooling Sweetlips on the dive site 'Susan's Bommie' in Loloata, PNG. I must have taken over 300 shots in the course of our 10 day workshop. The shutter speed is 1/8th sec at f 11, ISO 200, on the 17 mm end of my Tokina. I used a panning motion at the same speed as the fish school. The majority of frames were a chaotic disorganised mess but every so often I'd get one that inspired me to continue with my 'play-time'. 398

FIG. 9.27 Motion blur and using slow shutter speeds will be either a love or hate relationship. I'm the former; I love the creative possibilities and the thrill of having no idea whatsoever how they will appear on my LCD screen! This shot shows the schooling Sweetlips on the dive site 'Susan's Bommie' in Loloata, PNG. I must have taken over 300 shots in the course of our 10 day workshop. The shutter speed is 1/8th sec at f 11, ISO 200, on the 17 mm end of my Tokina. I used a panning motion at the same speed as the fish school. The majority of frames were a chaotic disorganised mess but every so often I'd get one that inspired me to continue with my 'play-time'. 398

FIG. 9.28 There are no excuses now for not having anything to take photos of! Or perhaps this looks like a total disaster to you. The shot depicts a staghorn coral formation using slow shutter panning. I set my Tokina fisheye zoom to the 10 mm end at f22 with a shutter speed of 1/10th of a sec. I pressed the shutter and 'panned', the camera from left to right as fast as I could.

FIG. 9.28 There are no excuses now for not having anything to take photos of! Or perhaps this looks like a total disaster to you. The shot depicts a staghorn coral formation using slow shutter panning. I set my Tokina fisheye zoom to the 10 mm end at f22 with a shutter speed of 1/10th of a sec. I pressed the shutter and 'panned', the camera from left to right as fast as I could.

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