Miscellaneous Faults

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Unexposed film

Processed film that is perfectly clear has never been exposed. This happens as a result of the film not advancing. Follow the loading instructions in your camera manual carefully and always remember to wind the end of an exposed film back inside the cassette.

Unexposed film frame

Image out of focus

If the final image is partially blurred, the aperture selected may have resulted in insufficient depth of field. Autofocus cameras may focus incorrectly through glass or if the subject is not center-frame. If the subject is off-center, use the focus lock (if your camera has one) and consult your camera manual regarding potential autofocus problems. If the shutter speed is below 1/30, slight camera shake can also cause this problem.

Image out of focus

Blemishes on print

These usually take the form of spots, lines, and scratches on the film caused by dust, dirt, hair, or grit inside the camera. Check the inside of the camera whenever you remove a film. Blemishes or out-of-focus spots are also often due to raindrops on the lens when the photograph was taken.

Out-of-focus spot on image

Red eye

A subject's eyes glowing red usually happens when the built-in flash on compact cameras and SLRs is very closely aligned with the lens. If you cannot bounce the flashlight from a nearby wall or ceiling before it reaches the subject, use a film that is faster and correct for the available light minus the flash.

Subject's eyes glowing red

Out-of-focus spot on image

Subject's eyes glowing red

Film fogging

This happens when non-image-forming light reaches the film, usually when you open the back of a camera before rewinding the film. Remember always to rewind the film before removing it. An ill-fitting or loose camera back can also allow enough light in to cause fogging.

Film fogged by light

Flare

Never point the camera directly at a bright light source unless the lens is adequately shaded, otherwise bright patches of light (flare) will obscure parts of the film and produce a washed-out image. Flare can also be caused by fine scratches on the mat-black interior of the camera.

Flare surrounding light source

Film fogged by light

Flare surrounding light source

Grainy image

Using the wrong film speed results in an overly grainy image. This usually occurs if extremely fast film is used. It is most apparent when an image is greatly enlarged - a smaller print minimizes it. To avoid excessive graininess, use a slower, finer-grain film with an increased exposure time, or add extra lighting. Grain shows up more in the neutral and light-toned areas of an image.

Overly grainy image

Half-framed image

This happens when you try to squeeze an extra frame of film at the end of a roll. Although film comes in standard lengths, you can occasionally take an extra frame. If the picture is important, however, it is worth taking the shot again when you have reloaded, in case the processing laboratory has to cut into the frame to detach the film from the core or attach a clip to the end while the film is drying.

Half-framed image

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Digital Camera and Digital Photography

Digital Camera and Digital Photography

Compared to film cameras, digital cameras are easy to use, fun and extremely versatile. Every day there’s more features being designed. Whether you have the cheapest model or a high end model, digital cameras can do an endless number of things. Let’s look at how to get the most out of your digital camera.

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