A gallery of panning

Since panning is one of the easiest, most effective, and powerful techniques for conveying motion, I thought I'd show a small gallery of images to encourage you to pan even more of your shots at a variety of shutter speeds. The captions will provide the details. Even when panning you should hold the camera vertically when the subject seems to better fit a vertical format. Exposure at 1 10 second, f 8. Even when panning you should hold the camera vertically when the subject seems to better fit a...

Authors Acknowledgments

Thanks to the many people involved in this project for both their patience and expertise. My daughter Bari Doeffinger, a fine writer in her own right, who edited the rough draft. To Carol Doeffinger for her meticulous (and I do mean meticulous) editing of the final manuscript. To John Wiley's Courtney Allen for taking on this project and providing valuable guidance. To fellow author, photographer, and friend Jeff Wignall for his suggestions, insights, and support. To Gary Whelpley, good friend...

Balancing shutter speed and depth of field

If you're good with money, one of those people who can create a budget, adhere to it, and come to the end of the month with enough money to pay the bills, well, then, you won't have a problem balancing shutter speed and aperture selection. The concept of correct exposure remains consistent throughout all combinations of shutter speed and aperture settings. Whatever the combination, whatever the shooting situation, you need to deliver a specific amount of light to the sensor to create a picture...

Learn To Unleash The Power Of Every Shutter Speed

Shutter speed is an integral part of exposure. Learn to use it creatively, and you unlock the magic that transforms an ordinary subject into a work of art. From the blazing 1 8000 second that captures each feather in a hummingbird's wing to the lazy half-second that turns a fireworks display into a color-rich patchwork, shutter speed allows you to freeze time. Derek Doeffinger teaches you to harness the power that separates the amateur from the professional. Unleash the power of shutter speed...

Everyday shutter speeds

Shutter speeds ranging from 1 60 second to 1 250 second are like your everyday work clothes. They're serviceable but nothing fancy. Quite simply, they get the job done. And, because you'll use these shutter speeds frequently for everyday photography, you'll likely become as comfortable with this range as you are with your favorite T-shirt and jeans. Of course, just as your everyday clothes aren't appropriate for every occasion, these everyday shutter speeds won't be suitable for every...

Shutter speeds for sharp pictures while handholding the camera

One of the greatest quality issues in taking pictures is the blur that can occur from the subtle shake of a person handholding the camera. That slight blur is magnified when you use a longer focal length that magnifies the image size. For instance, if you zoom from a 50mm focal length to a 200mm focal length, you've magnified not only the image 4X but also the movement that results from handholding the camera. You can counteract the blur from camera shake by using a fast shutter speed. How fast...

Determining a stopaction shutter speed

What shutter speed is fast enough to freeze your six-year-old as she wobbles away on her roller blades Your skateboarding teen perfecting a One-footed Ollie A horse leaping over a timber jump or a waverunner, throttle open full, slashing toward the finish line Several motion and photographic variables not just subject speed impact this decision. We'll cover them. But to help you stop most action most of the time, let's use a chart based on miles per hour to guide you. We're going to assume...

Second a former record holder

Although it's been quite a while since 1 1000 second could claim the title of the world's fastest shutter speed, it did indeed hold the title at a singular time in history. This shutter speed once a milestone innovation began appearing in cameras about the time Jesse Owens took center stage at the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin. That newfangled 1 1000 second shutter speed meant that Owens, his contemporary Sea Biscuit, and all the other speed demons of the sports world could be stopped in their...

How the shutter works

Like the automatic door at the grocery store, your shutter is an electro-mechanical device that opens and closes when an electrical signal triggers it. That electrical signal is initiated when you press the shutter button. How long it stays open depends on the shutter speed you or the camera selects. Shutter speeds are designated by seconds and fractions of seconds, such as 1 250 second, 1 125 second, 1 2 second, and 1 second. The marked increments of shutter speed settings have traditionally...

Second for the scenic shooter

The poor cousin of 1 250 second, 1 125 second is another all-purpose speed, one you can easily use on both sunny and cloudy days. The difference in how you use 1 250 and 1 125 is subtle but telling. At 1 125 second you've reached a threshold of sorts, the boundary where you are less concerned about stopping movement and more concerned about achieving greater depth of field to give your pictures overall sharpness. The forte of 1 125 second may well be landscape photography on bright days. You...

Info

Shines as the understudy who can step into a starring role when conditions seem a bit too dim and dreary for the faster shutter speeds that usually star in your pictures. But there is one place where 1 60 second sheds the understudy role to become the star, and that's action photography. But not stop-action photography, because even a toddler can outrun 1 60 second. Instead, 1 60 second stars in the lead role of panning. And boy can it grab your eye and rivet your attention. You might not think...