Color Accuracy

Color checker shot using Electronic Flash with Auto White Balance. Auto Levels applied.

interchangeable and the back could be used with different bodies. It may be possible to attach a back having similar shutter speed range. The camera allows a maximum of 1.8 fps burst rate (it's a penalty one pays for the high megapixel rating), though shutter speed bracketing is possible up to 5 frames at 1/3 or 1/2 stop interval Flash sync is up to 1/125sec. The camera body is powered through 6xAA type alkaline batteries which fit into the hand-grip.

Note that ISO and White Balance are features in the digital back and not in the camera body (as we are used to seeing in the 35mm format). Focus mode selection is on the camera body; three modes are available-Single (S), Continuous (C), and Manual focus (M). After selecting the focus mode on the body, you have to select either AF or MF on the lens.

The Lens

We used a Schneider Kruznach 80mm f/2.8 LS lens for our tests. The 80mm f/2.8 !_S lens incorporates its own leaf shutter with a shutter speed range of 1/60 sec to 1/1600 sec and can synchronize with electronic flash

ISO: 2001 OMR

ISO: 3200 10MP

ISO: 2001 OMR

ISO: 3200 10MP

Color checker shot using Electronic Flash with Auto White Balance. Auto Levels applied.

at all shutter speeds. This allows for electronic flash to be used outdoors as 'fill-in' in bright sunlight. So what if, for whatever reason, you need to use slower shutter speeds with flash? In that case, you can switch over to the camera body's focal plane shutter which will synchronize with flash from its slowest shutter speed of 60 minutes up to 1/125sec.

The Digital Back

The P40+ back is a 40-megapixeI digital solution for those who require this kind of resolution. It boasts of a large (32.9 x 43.9 mm) CCD sensor made by Dalsa (but designed by Phase One). Dalsa manufactures the sensor exclusively for Phase One P40+ and P65+ (All previous Phase One backs use sensors made by Kodak). The forte of the P40+ is that it can be used to provide an output of 40 megapixels (the pixel size is 6 x 6 microns), or 10 megapixels (when the pixel size changes to 12 x 12 microns). The technology that allows us to use the P40-F at 10 megapixel is referred to as Sensor+ technology. In this mode, four pixels are combined to work as a single pixel. This allows us to use higher ISO sensitivities without the accompanying increase in digital noise (larger the pixel, lesser the digital noise). It also permits a faster workflow. Incidentally, at full resolution (40 MP), the P40+ has a ISO sensitivity range from 50-800; using Sensor + technology (10 MP), the ISO sensitivity rage is from 2003200. When using this back, the effective focal length inc reases by a factor of 1.3. In other words, an 80mm lens covers the same field of view that a 104mm lens would cover. As per Phase One, the P40+ offers a dynamic range of 12.5 f-stops! Another very important feature to note is that after every exposure, the digital back goes into sleep mode. This ensures that the sensor does nut unduly warm up, (which could lead to noise creeping in) and also ensures that colors do not shift with the sensor warming up. As noted earlier, the ISO sensitivity and White Balance is set in the digital back and not in the camera body. Six WB settings are on offer—Auto, Daylight, Flash, Tungsten, Fluorescent, and Custom (3 settings). The back has its own power supply-a rechargeable 2600mAh li-ion battery.

images are recorded on CF card in losslessly compressed 16-bit RAW (HQ 1_, or HQ S. HQ stands for Intelligent Image Quality, their nomenclature for RAW; L and S stand for Large and Small respectively). In full resolution mode, HQ L is 40MB while HQ S is 26MB. In Sensor+ mode, HQ L is 10MB and HQS is 7MB. Tethered shooting (directly connecting the camera to a computer during shooting) is possible. The back uses a 160 degree

PHASE ONE P40+

FINAL SnORF

Design and Build Quality

18/20

Key Features

16/20

Ergonomics

17/20

Performance

18/20

Value for Money

17/20

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