Adjusting Exposure with Scene Balance

As with Enhance, the Scene Balance window shows you a before-and-after image of your photo. You can zero in on problem areas, and compare your corrections to the original. Nothing's set in stone until you save the file. Remember that cropping always shrinks your photos. Remove too many pixels, and your photo may end up too small (that is, with a resolution too low to print or display properly). Here's an example Say you start with a 1600 x 1200 pixel photo. Ordinarily, that's large enough to be...

Creating Special Effects

As you've seen in the past few chapters, editing and retouching photos often involves making subtle changes. The goal is to make your photos look better, yet still completely natural, which requires a light hand and a sense of moderation. Get ready to rock and roll. When you use special effects, you can toss moderation out the window. With a little help from your computer, you can make your photos look like, well, a psychedelic rock and roll poster from the 1960s. You can transform a color...

Frequently Asked Question The Sharp Unsharp Mask

Why, oh why, is Unsharp Mask on the same menu with the sharpening tools It sounds exactly like what I don't want to do to my photos . To be fair, it's not Adobe's fault Unsharp mask is an old photographer's term. Elements' Unsharp Mask is a digital replication of an ingenious darkroom technique. To sharpen film prints, photographers would create a blurred negative, and then lay it over the original negative. When light passed through the layered negatives onto photo paper, the images combined...

Rotating Photos

When you shoot with your camera turned 90 degrees, you can look at the shot even years later and see immediately which way is up. Digital cameras and computers, however, aren't quite so smart. For example, not all cameras output photos so that Elements (or any other image- editing program, for that matter) knows the correct orientation for your picture. Fortunately, Elements has rotation commands just about everywhere in the program. If all you need to do is get Dad off his back and stand him...

Sharing Photos with Easy Share

There's the EasyShare software (Section 5.2.1 ) that runs on your computer, where you organize and edit your photos, and there's EasyShare Gallery (www.kodakgallery.com ) where you share your photos online and order prints. Once you've created your online photo album(s) you pick the photos you want to share. Then, with the Gallery's help, you send out email invitations. When your friends receive the invites, all they have to do is click a link and they're...

Sharing Photos with Snapfish

Like Shutterfly, Snapfish (www.snapfish.com) makes photo sharing simple. You can share more than one album at once, but you can't pick and choose photos from different albums as you can with EasyShare. Tip To mix and match photos from different albums, you need to create a new album, copy photos to it, and then share that new album. For details on copying photos between albums, see Section 6.8.1.1. Once you've uploaded photos into Snapfish albums (Section 6.7.1), sharing them is a breeze

Troubleshooting Moment How to Really Get Rid of Red

For years now, camera manufacturers have been inflicting red-eye reduction mode on their customers. It's a series of bright, strobing flashes that's not only annoying to the people you're photographing, but doesn't even work. What causes red eye In a dimly lit room, the subject's pupil dilates, revealing more of the retina. On cameras where the flash is close to the camera lens (as it almost always is), the light from the flash shines through the dilated pupil, bounces off the retina, and...

With Picasas window in Library view click a photos thumbnail to select it

If you want to email more than one photo, Ctrl-click additional thumbnails. As you select pictures, they show up in the Picture Tray in the lower-left corner (Figure 153). Figure 15-3. Emailing photos with Picasa is delightfully straightforward. You can preview your selected photos in the Picture Tray (at lower left). When you're ready to send them, click the Email button (at lower right). Picasa does the heavy lifting It resizes your photos, opens a new email message, Figure 15-3. Emailing...

Easy Shares Backup Tools

If your computer has a CD or DVD burner, EasyShare gives you the tools to burn your photos to discs. Again, the best time to back up is as soon as you download photos to your PC and get them into EasyShare albums (Section 6.4.1). Note EasyShare doesn't make it particularly easy to back up your photos to a hard drive. Here's the short version In the My Collection tab, select the pictures you want to back up and then choose File' Open in Explorer. A Windows Explorer folder opens up, at which...

Applying Auto Contrast and Auto Color

The I'm Feeling Lucky button tries to fix both color and contrast problems in your photo, but sometimes, well, you don't get lucky. Sometimes you only need one or the other of these fixes and you're the best one to decide which to use. Mabye the colors in your photo have an odd color cast to them for example, everything may be too yellow. You need a color adjustment. Or perhaps the colors blend together in an indistinct musheverything is the same tone, and there are no light and dark...

Resizing Images for Email and the

When your photo is destined for viewing onscreen, it should have enough resolution to be clear and easy to view without being oversized. Have you ever gotten an emailed photo that was so huge you could see only a tiny bit of it at once That happens when an image isn't optimized for viewing on a monitor. Today's multimegapixel digital cameras spew out high-resolution images that look great when printed, but you need to reduce them for comfortable onscreen viewing. Fortunately, Elements makes it...

Figure 615 Simply drag and drop to rearrange photos in a Snapfish album Once your album is in order youve got the basis

IS )f . h Ir a ri i Fh hotos - Mit i osof t I nte i net E x > lo i f Click on and drag each photo to the symbol next to tha de position. Then click on 'save arrangement1. Need help your album oregon 03 15 06 Copy of f - fax bolinas corner sunse Copy of f - fax bolinas corner sunse

To resize your selection drag one of the little handles on the sides and corners

They look like little squares as shown in Figure 10-11 . You can drag in any direction, so you can also change the proportions of your crop if you want to. 3. If you change your mind, click Cancel (the no symbol) on the photo, or press the Esc key . That undoes the selection so you can start over or switch to another tool if you decide you don't want to crop after all. Figure 10-11. If you want to change your selection from horizontal to vertical, or vice versa, then just move your cursor...

Send the email on its way

In the case of Outlook, for example, click the Send button in the message's upper-left corner. Figure 15-4. You can edit and send the message just like any other email. This example shows the invitation in an Outlook email. All you need to do is fill in the blanks. Figure 15-4. You can edit and send the message just like any other email. This example shows the invitation in an Outlook email. All you need to do is fill in the blanks. Powerful program that it...

From the dropdown list choose a folder type Pictures or Photo Album

The choice you make here determines what view you'll see when you open the folder. Choose Pictures to make the folder open in Thumbnails view (just like My Pictures). If you choose Photo Album, you get Filmstrip view, as shown in (Figure 5-4 ). This view displays a single large image, plus a filmstrip along the bottom to help you navigate through your photos. Figure 5-3. What kind of folder do you want to create today You can make any folder photo-friendly by tweaking the settings in its...

Review your order

The last step is to review your order and make sure it matches your expectations. If all's well, click continue, and Snapfish responds by showing you a receipt. After that, it's simply a matter of checking your mailbox for photos. Adobe has partnered with EasyShare Gallery to make it easy to upload photos directly from the Organizer so you can let someone else take care of the picture- printing duties for you. Elements sports an Order Prints pane in the Organize bin, just below where you see...

Cropping Photos

Whether or not you straightened your photo, you'll probably need to crop ittrim it to a certain size. There are two main reasons for cropping your photos. If you want to print on standard sizes of photo paper, you usually need to trim off part of your image so it fits onto the paper. You also might want to crop away distracting objects in the background or people you don't want in the picture, for instance. A few cameras produce photos that are proportioned exactly right for printing to a...

Assigning Tags to Photos

When an image first gets imported into the Organizer, the Image Well shows only the photos in the batch of photos you've just imported. With the Photo Browser in Folder Location view (Figure 8-2), you'll see an icon in the upper-right corner of the Image Well called Instant Tag. Clicking it assigns the photo's folder name as a tag to all the photos in the group. To assign a tag to a photo at any time, just drag the tag's icon from the Organize bin onto the photo's thumbnail. To add the same tag...

Choose Nothing to exit the wizard

The wizard offers the same three choices as when you use it to transport digital photos to your PC. None really belong herefew people would order prints of something after they've just scanned the print versionso choose Nothing. The wizard closes, dropping you off in the folder that holds your newly created scanned image file. Once your photo's turned into a file, you can email it as an attachment (Chapter 15 ) or print it (Chapter 16 ).

Photo when you resample it

When you enlarge an image to more than 100 percent of its original size, you'll definitely lose some of the original quality. So, for example, if you try to stretch a photo that's 3 wide at 180 ppi to an 8 x 10 print, then chances are you won't like the results. Elements offers you several resampling methods, and they do a very good job when you find the right one for your situation. You select them in the Resample Image menu in the Image Size dialog box. Adobe recommends choosing Bicubic...

Price single 4 x 6 print

Online photo-storage and sharing services compared Table 6-1. Online photo-storage and sharing services compared To use EasyShare Gallery, you need to set up an online account. Surf to www.kodakgallery.com . On the main page's upper-left, click the Get Started button. When the Welcome screen appears, type your name, email address, and password, turn on the checkbox to agree to the Terms of Service, and then click the Join Now button. Note The first time you upload photos with your...

Scanned Item or Destination

Scan at resolutions higher than 300 dpi only when you want to enlarge something tinya postage stamp, for instanceto view minute details. Figure 4-9. This Properties box lets you choose a resolution suitable for whatever you intend to do with your scanned image. The Resolution's menu lists all the resolutions your scanner can handle, usually 50 to 2400 dpi or more, but you rarely want anything more than 300. As a general rule of thumb, choose 75 dpi for photos you're going to email, 150 when...

On the Home page click the upload photos link

In Snapfish, all photos are stored in albums, so when you upload photos, you must specify an album to put them in. When the upload page opens, type a name in the text box under the new album icon to create a new album to hold your uploaded photos. (In the future, this page will display icons of all the albums you've created, so you can upload photos into an existing album.) Note The first time you upload photos, Snapfish asks you to install QuickUpload, its browser plug-in. Click Install to...

Six photos at a time Elements can automatically separate and straighten the individual photos from a group scan like

If you have any intention of digitizing generations of ancient snapshots, Divide Scanned Photos is worth the whole price of Elements. The only limit on the number of photos is how many you can fit on your scanner. It doesn't matter whether you scan directly into Elements or use your scanner's own software, and it doesn't matter what file format you save the scanned image in. (See Chapter 4 for more about scanning images into Elements.) Note Sometimes it pays to be crooked. Divide Scanned Photos...

Navigating the Styles and Effects Palette

If you're more comfortable with visual clues, you can also find most filters in the Styles and Effects palette (Figure 13-10 ). You'll see a little pull-down menu on the left side. Choose Filters there, and then you can use the menu on the right to limit your viewing options to filters in any particular category, if you like. The categories are the same ones you see in the Filter menu. Figure 13-10. The Styles and Effects palette gives you a preview of what every filter looks like when applied...

Type your email addresses a subject and a message for the invitation Then click Next to upload your photos and send the

A box appears, showing you the progress in uploading your photos. After the upload is complete, you see a window that thanks you for using Shutterfly and includes a link to the page that shares your photos. Meanwhile, your friends receive an attractive invitation by email (Figure 14-7 ). Tip The Thank You window also offers to add your email recipients to your Shutterfly address book, so that in the future you can just select them instead of manually typing out their addresses. Figure 14-7....

Undoing an Effect

EasyShare makes sure you don't lose your original photos when you're playing around with special effects. You have several ways to undo your experiments Cancel . While you're working with the photos, there's the handy Cancel button at the bottom of the screen. Clicking Cancel while you're previewing an effect puts you back at square one. Undo . If you've gone beyond the preview stage and clicked the Accept button, you can still undo your work using two of the buttons at the bottom of the Edit...

Rotating and Flipping Options

Elements gives you several ways to change the orientation of your photo. To see what's available, in the Editor, choose Image i* Rotate. You'll notice two groups of Rotate commands in this menu. For now, it's the top group you want to focus on. In the first group of commands, you'll see Rotate 90 Left or Right. Use these commands, as explained in the previous section, for digital photos that come in on their sides. Rotate 180 turns your photo upside down and backward. Flip Horizontal. Flipping...

In the Pixel Dimensions area enter the dimension you want for the longer side of your photo

Usually you'd want 650 pixels or less. Be sure that pixels show as the unit of measurement. You just need to enter the number for one side. Elements figures it out for the other side as long as Constrain Proportions is turned on down near the bottom of the dialog box. (You need to turn on Resample Image before you can change the pixel dimensions.) Figure 10-16. Both these computers have a screen resolution of 1024 x 768 pixels, and the photo they're displaying takes up exactly the same...

Examine the printed results

When you finally have the print in your hand, take a close look at it. Is it aligned on the page the way you expected If not, you can make adjustments with Easy-Share's Align Paper button at the top of the screen. Tip If your inkjet-printed photos show streaks, the problem may be the print heads, not your paper or settings. Inkjet printer software often gives you tools to clean clogged nozzles. Check your printer's instructions. Picasa makes printing easy. You make decisions about the size and...

Adjusting Fill Light in Your Photos

Picasa's Fill Light tool is designed to fix a problem that's pretty common for outdoor pictures. How many times have you seen beach pictures where the background is bright but the faces are lost in shadows With the Fill Light slider, found in Picasa's Edit View (View * Edit View) you can make the shadowy faces a bit brighter. The Fill Light slider bar appears on both the Basic Fixes panel and the Tuning panel in Edit View. Adjustment is a simple matter of moving the slider until you're pleased...

In the albums list select the albums you want to share

The words This album will be shared appear under each album you select. The selected albums also show up in the Your Slideshow list (Figure 14-3 ). If you don't make any changes, EasyShare creates a slideshow that starts with the album at the top of your list. However, EasyShare gives you a couple of ways to tweak your slideshow. Figure 14-3. EasyShare creates a slideshow from the photos you choose. You can change the order of your albums, and you can choose which photos from your albums go...

Order your prints

An easy-to-follow wizard appears to help you set up your account. (If you already have an EasyShare account, just log in.) Select the size and number of prints for each photo, as shown in Figure 16-18 . You'll receive an envelope of prints in the mail a few days later. Figure 16-18. Elements gives you a separate collection of print size order boxes to choose from for each picture you've added. Click any of the green + buttons to increase your order number by one for a particular print size. Or,...

Using the Color sliders

If you want to adjust the colors in your photo without changing the brightness, then check out the Color sliders. For example, your digital camera may produce colors that don't quite match what you saw when you took the picture, or you may have scanned an old print that's faded or discolored, or you may want to change the colors in a photo just for the heck of it. If so, the sliders below the Auto Color button are for you. You get four ways to adjust your colors here Saturation controls the...

Sharpness too

One of the scariest sights in Elements, the Levels dialog box is actually your very good friend. If it frightens you, take comfort in knowing that you've always got the Auto button here, which is the same Auto Levels command as in the Quick Fix. But it's worth persevering the other options here give you much better control over the end results. Figure 12-6. One of the scariest sights in Elements, the Levels dialog box is actually your very good friend. If it frightens you, take...

Changing Your View of Your Photos

Sometimes, rather than changing the size of your photo, all you want to do is change its appearance in Elements so you can get a better look at it. For example, you may want to zoom in on a particular area, or zoom out, so you can see how edits you've made have affected your photo's overall composition. Figure 10-1. The Standard Editor is your control center for sprucing up your photos. This window's jam-packed with loads of tools, but for this chapter all you need to know about are the Figure...

Beyond the Simple Snapshot

There you sit, surveying your boxes of old photos. Snapshots of your family. Vacation snapshots. Snapshots of tourist attractions. But they're all snapshots. Then you think of professional photos you've seen in magazines and newspapers. There's the extreme close-up of a ladybug on a leaf, with the bushes in the background gently out of focus. There's that amazing shot of the soccer player butting the ball with his head, frozen in action so you can see individual flecks of sweat flying from his...

If you wish turn off the Require friends to sign in to view and save your photos checkbox

EasyShare automatically turns on this option, which means your friends must create their own EasyShare accounts before they can view your photos. This blatant Kodak recruiting ploy actually has a benefit for you, too When you leave this option turned on, you get a record of who's viewed your photos. Furthermore, if your guests want to order prints, then they must have an EasyShare account. Requiring them to sign up at the outset saves them time later. Figure 14-4. You don't even have to fire up...

Launch the program and then click the big orange Get pictures button in the upperleft corner Figure 610 Or choose File

A Get Pictures box opens, with navigation tools much like the ones you see when you upload using the Shutterfly Web site. Figure 6-10. When you choose a photo folder on your computer or a connected camera, memory card, or CD, Shutterfly Express shows you all the JPEG photos it finds in the left pane. When you click a thumbnail, you see a big image at right. This window is also where you can edit photos

When youre satisfied with the number of photos and the order theyre in cli Next Step

In step 3 of the wizard, you see a preview of your project. If your project has space for text, you can add it as shown in Figure 17-14 . You can change the font, size, and justification (alignment) for multiple lines of text, but the starting options are usually pi effective, too. Use the pull-down menu above the image to navigate to the different pa> of your project, if it has more than one page, or use the arrows to step backward and forward through the pages. When you've got your text...

Turn on your scanner choose the Scanner and Camera Wizard if necessary and then click Next at the Welcome screen

As soon as you turn on your scanner or plug it into your computer, the wizard appears with a greeting. When you click Next, the wizard lists all the programs on your PC capable of handling scans (Figure 4-7 ) your first decision is what program you want to handle the job. For the quickest and easiest scanning, choose Windows XP's built-in Scanner and Camera Wizard, the same sorcerer that conjures pictures out of your digital camera. Don't see the wizard You can summon it manually with a...

If you have more than one printer then click the little icon to the right of the printer name Choose your photo printer

The next few steps explain how to use the multiple print options. Figure 16-8. The strip on the left side of the window holds thumbnails for all the photos you plan to print. If you're creating a picture package or a contact sheet, you can add or remove images by clicking the + or - buttons at the bottom of Figure 16-8. The strip on the left side of the window holds thumbnails for all the photos you plan to print. If you're creating a picture package or a contact sheet, you can add or remove...

Straightening Photos

What about all those photos you've taken where the content isn't quite straight You can flip those pictures around forever, but if your camera was off-kilter when you snapped the shot, then your subjects lean like a certain tower in Pisa. Elements has planned for this problem too, by including a nifty Straighten tool that makes adjusting the horizon as easy as drawing a line. Tip About 95 percent of the time, the Straighten tool does the trick, But for the few cases where you can't get things...

Click OK to close the Label Properties box

The new label folder shows in the Labels collection at the top of the Folder List (Figure 5-17 ). The label's name and other descriptive text show in the banner in the Lightbox above the thumbnails. Figure 5-17. The Labels Collection at the top of the Folder List conveniently gathers all your labeled photos in eponymous folders. Label folders have a special icon to remind you that they're different from ordinary folders. The thumbnails in these folders provide a reminder, tooa small triangle in...

Choose the photos you want to include

Click the Browse button in the window to see a list of the folders and files on your hard drive. Navigate to the one you want and click Choose. If you can't select all the photos at once because they aren't all in the same folder, you can click Browse as many times as you want, and the new files get added to the list in the window. Figure 13-15. It helps to prepare your photos for merging by adjusting them side by side so that you can compare the colors. Here, a combination of Levels and a...

Getting Started with Calibrating

Calibrating a monitor sounds horribly complicated, but it's actually not that difficult and it's even kind of fun. You get an added benefit in that your monitor may look about a thousand times better than you thought it could. Calibrating may even make it easier to read text in Word, for instance, because the contrast is better. When you install Elements, Adobe gives you the Adobe Gamma Utility to calibrate your monitor. To get to it, choose Start * Control Panel '* Appearance and Themes t...

Figure 1615 The Shutterfly Express cart makes it easy to order

It even provides helpful advice regarding the resolution of your photo files (Section 16.1.1 ). When a photo doesn't have enough resolution for the size print you've chosen, you get the not suggested message. If you're ordering several photos, be sure to use the scroll bar on the right to view your entire order. Once you've reviewed your cart, it's simply a matter of providing details for shipping and payment.

Use captions to identify and sort photos

A picture may be worth a thousand words, but a few choice words can help you find and identify your pictures in EasyShare. To add a caption to a selected photo, choose File > Properties and type it in the Caption box (Figure 5-10 ) or you can add a caption simply by clicking underneath the thumbnail and entering text. When you add captions, use distinct and descriptive words. For example, instead of mom and her pups, a caption like, Campbell and her pups Lola, Goose, and Max will help you...

Natural Lighting for Objects

Of course, you won't always be at home with a bunch of lights and roll paper at your disposal. Many of your object shots will be more spontaneous, impromptu affairs, or you may decide that a home studio isn't your cup of tea. In these cases, let nature provide the lighting. When taking natural-light shots, the trick is to keep your subject out of direct sunlight, which would create harsh contrast and bright hot spots on the object's surface. Instead, work in open shade, preferably in the...

Editing label descriptions

Label descriptions are just as important as folder descriptions. Good names and accurate descriptions make it easier for you to find and identify photos when you're browsing. They also make it easier for Picasa to find the photos when you conduct a search. Change the names and descriptions of labels by choosing Label * Edit Description. You see the same Label Properties dialog box as when you create a new label. From here, you can change the label's name, date, place, and caption.

Share Photo Show button

Other buttons on this screen let you email individual photos from your slideshows, or upload photos to a Shutterfly or Snapfish account. But don't be fooled only the Share PhotoShow button lets you share slideshows . Figure 17-3. Use the PhotoShow Info box to give your slideshow a good title. Turn on the Rename items checkbox and PhotoShow renames the photo files using the name of the slideshow and a sequence of numbers. So, for example, this slide show, titled Death Valley Days with Mary, has...

Shadows and Highlights

The Shadows and Highlights tools do an amazing job of bringing out the details that are lost in the shadows or bright areas of your photo. Figure 11-8 shows what a difference these tools can make. Figure 11-8. Top This photo shows a classic vacation picture problem the day is bright, the scenery's beautiful, but everyone's faces are hidden by dark shadows. Bottom The Shadows and Highlights tools brought back everyone's faces, but now they look a bit jaundiced. Use the color sliders to make them...

Adding Canvas

Just like the works of Monet and Matisse, your photos appear in Elements on a digital canvas. Sometimes you may want to add more canvas to make room for text or if you're combining photos into a collage. To make your canvas larger, choose Image + Resize Canvas Size. You can change the size of your canvas using a variety of measurements. If you don't know exactly how much more canvas you want, choose Percent. Then you can guesstimate that you want, say, 2 percent more canvas or 50 percent more....

Lighting up the stage with spot metering

If your camera has a spot-meter mode, your budding performers in the spotlight have a fighting chance against a dark backdrop. As noted earlier in this chapter, your camera generally gauges the brightness of the scene by averaging the light across the entire framea recipe for disaster when you're shooting the stage. Spot metering, however, lets you designate a particular spot in the scene whose brightness you want the camera to measure. (You indicate what spot that is by positioning a frame...

Resizing your photo

You can resize your photo in Print Preview in several ways Print Size menu . Choose any print size from the list or enter a Custom Size. Fit On Page changes the size of your image, if necessary, to fit the size of the paper you're using. Scaled Print Size . Resize your photo by a certain percent or by entering new dimensions here. (If you want a custom size, just enter the size here. You don't have to change the Print Size drop-down menu, too.) Bounding Box . You can also use the bounding box...

Choose an existing album from the dropdown menu or type a name for a new one Then click Next to seal the deal

Deleting photos from an album Shutterfly is nothing if not consistent. You delete photos almost exactly the same way as you move and copy them. On the View & enhance page, choose an album and select the photos you want to do away with (see steps 12 above). In the command list at right, click Delete pictures. A message box pops up asking you to confirm the deletion. Hit Enter. Deleting pictures in Shutterfly removes them from the Web site only, not from your computer. (Of course,...

Making Your Colors More Vibrant

Do you drool over the luscious photos in travel magazinesthe ones that make regular, non-vacation life seem pretty drab in comparison What is it about those photos that makes things look so dramatic A lot of the time the answer is the saturation, or the intensity, of the colors. Supersaturated colors make even ordinary landscapes and objects really pop (to use the technical term). It's not necessary to work on an entire photo when changing its saturation. By increasing the saturation of your...

Changing the Size of Your Photos

Resizing your photo brings you up against a pretty tough concept in digital imaging resolution , which measures, in pixels, the amount of detail your image can show. Especially confusing is the fact that the resolutions you want for printing and for onscreen use (like email and the Web) are quite different. That's because it takes many more pixels to create a good-looking print than you need for a photo that's going to be viewed only onscreen. A photo that's going to print well almost always...

Shoot with sweet light

Photographers generally covet the first and last two hours of the day for shooting (which half explains why they're always getting up at five in the morning). The lower angle of the sun and the slightly denser atmosphere create rich, saturated tones, as well as what photographers call sweet light. It's a far cry from the midday sun, which creates much harsher shadows and more severe highlights. Landscape shooting is more difficult when the sun is high overhead on a bright, cloudless day.

Adjusting Saturation with the Sponge Tool

You can also adjust saturation with the Sponge tool. The Sponge tool is very handy for working on small areas, but all that dragging gets old pretty fast when you're working on a large chunk of your image. For those situations, use Hue Saturation instead. To use the Sponge tool, drag over the area you want to change. Figure 12-14 shows an example of the kind of work the Sponge does. 1. In the toolbox, click the Sponge tool (or press O and choose the Sponge icon). Then, in the Options bar,...

Back in the Scanner and Camera Wizard main window click the Preview button lasso your image if necessary and then click

Don't skip this important step Clicking the Preview button tells the scanner to make a quick scan, locate your image's position, and lasso itoutline the image's edges with a little square. By locating the image, the scanner then knows to scan only that portion of its bed. If you skip the preview, the scanner simply scans its entire bed, creating a huge file with your image floating somewhere inside. The wizard's usually pretty good with its lasso, but if it's a little off target, drag inward or...

Tour of the Filter Gallery

The Filter Gallery, shown in Figure 13-11 , is one of Elements' more popular features. It gives you a large preview window, plus thumbnails so you have a visual guide to what your filter will do. If you want an even larger preview, you can click the arrow that the cursor is over in the figure to collapse the thumbnails and regain that entire section for preview space. The Gallery is more for artistic filters than for corrective filters. You can't apply the Sharpening or Noise filters from the...

Tour of the Photo Browser

The Photo Browser may look a little intimidating the first time you see it, but it's actually laid out quite logically. Figure 8-2 shows the Photo Browser's main components. In the main part of the window, you see thumbnails of all the photos you've imported (Adobe calls this area the Image Well ). You have a lot of control over what you see in the Image Well via the View menu. For example, if you have a lot of photos in front of you, then you can put them in chronological order by choosing...

Adjusting Levels The Slider Controls

The eyedropper method works fine if your photo has spots that should be black, white, or gray, but a lot of the time, your picture may not have any of these colors. Fortunately, the Levels sliders give you yet another way to apply Levels, and it's by far the most popular method. Using the sliders gives you maximum control over your colors, and it works great even for photos that don't have a white, black, or gray point to click. If you look directly under the Histogram, you'll see three little...

Adjusting Lighting and Contrast

The Lighting palette lets you make very sophisticated adjustments to the brightness and contrast of your photo. Sometimes problems that you thought stemmed from exposure or even focus may right themselves with these commands. Figure 11-6. When you move a slider in any of the Quick Fix palettes, the cancel and checkmark buttons appear in the palette you're using. Click the Cancel symbol to undo the last change you made, or click the checkmark (Accept) to apply the change to your image. If you...

Drag a line in your photo to show Elements where horizontal should be

As shown in Figure 10-6 , you draw your line at an angle. Elements automatically levels out your photo, making your line the true horizontal plane in the image. If the rotation moves parts of your image outside the frame, Elements either trims or leaves them, depending on what you chose in the Options bar. Tip If you have a photo of trees, sailing ships, skyscrapers, or any other subject where you'd rather straighten vertically than horizontally, then just hold down Ctrl while you drag. The...

Using Color Variations

The Color Variations window (Figure 12-11 ) is very appealing to many Elements beginners, because it gives you a visual clue about what to do to fix the color in your photo. You just click the little preview thumbnail that shows the color balance you like best, and Elements applies the necessary change to make your photo look like the thumbnail. However, Color Variations has some pretty severe limitations, most notably, the microscopic size of the thumbnails. It's very hard to see accurately...

Navigating Your Photo Folders in Organizer

If you'd like to get a simultaneous look at your pictures and the folders on your PC where they're stored, choose View + Arrangement -4 Folder Location (or choose from the drop-down menu at lower left in Figure 8-2 ). A new pane on the left appears, showing the folder structure, including the exact location of the current batch of photos. Just as in Windows XP's Explorer Bar (Section 5.1.2 ), you navigate by clicking plus and minus signs to expand and collapse folders, working your way down to...

Scene Effects

Scene Effects each change a photo's overall appearance with a single click. Unlike Picasa and Elements, EasyShare doesn't give you any settings to tinker with. No Effect exists primarily to cancel out any effect you've already added. Black and White makes your color photo black and white. Technically, this effect translates the image's color information into grayscale. Sepia Tone makes your photo look like an old-fashioned daguerreotype. It does the same thing as the Black and White effect, but...

Under Create a Backup CD click New

A backup set keeps track of the files that you're backing up and the location where they're saved. (If you've backed up before, your sets appear on the dropdown menu pick one of these if you want to follow a previously established backup routine full details follow after step 5.) Figure 7-3. According to Picasa, backing up your photos should be as easy as 1-2 you don't even need a 3. First you create a backup set, which Picasa uses to remember where to save your backup files and which files...

Tweaking white balance color balance

Here's a mind-bending example of the way your eyes and your camera see things completely differently. It turns out that different kinds of lightsregular incandescent lightbulbs, fluorescent office lighting, the suncast subtle tinges of color on everything they illuminate. When you shoot non-flash photos indoors or in open shade outside, you'll get a bluish or cool cast. If you shoot without a flash under incandescent lighting, then the shots will have a warm tint, mostly yellow and red. So why...

Index

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z file size dilemma overcoming it 2nd slider bar fill-in flash 2nd 3rd Film Grain effect Picasa filter softening Filter Gallery Photoshop Elements Filtered B amp W effect Picasa filters 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th Photoshop Elements 2nd 3rd applying categories FireWire port Fisheye effect EasyShare flash auto auto mode built-in vs. external external 2nd fill-in forced outdoor photos indoor use nighttime mode outdoor portraits...

Fine Tuning Your Panorama

Once you get all your photos positioned to suit you, you may want to adjust the result to make things look a bit smoother. Elements has several other commands to help you do so. On the right side of the Photomerge window, you see several rows of buttons and checkboxes. You'll usually want to try at least a couple of these settings to improve your panorama. At the top, you see the usual OK and Cancel buttons for when you're ready to create your panorama or when you change your mind about the...

Creating and Removing Albums

Albums are your primary tool for organizing photos in EasyShare Figure 5-8 . You impose order on your photo library by creating albums for different subjects Museum Sunday, Oregon Vacation, Nature Photos, and so on, much the same way you organize your photos into folders in Windows XP. Albums have a distinct advantage over folders, though They don't take up nearly as much room on your computer's hard drive. So go ahead and put a single photo into more than one album if you want. For example,...

Taking advantage of open shade

Working in open shade, like the shadow of a tree, produces less dramatic portraits than rim lighting, but very pleasing ones nonetheless. Open shade eliminates harsh shadows around the face and keeps the subject from squinting. Here again, forcing the flash on your digital camera is a great idea. Look for a subtle background without distracting elements. The beauty of this technique is that you capture an evenly lit, relaxed subject with a perfectly exposed background. You won't even notice...

Refining your search

Date Range Search Slider

Because Picasa uses such a broad range of properties for its searches, your results may include too many photos. For example, you may wish you could search for baby only when it appears in keywords, not captions or folder names. Unfortunately, Picasa doesn't give you a way to limit searches to certain properties. With experience, you can find ways to increase the odds of finding the photos you want and filter out the photos you don't . Here are some techniques to help you refine your searches...

Slowsynchro or Nighttime flash mode

This automatic mode synchronizes your flash with the very slow shutter. It may have a stars and mountain or stars and person icon. The camera opens the shutter long enough to compensate for the dim twilight lighting, capturing all of the rich, saturated colors. The flash, meanwhile, throttles down, emitting just enough light to illuminate the subject from the front. Figure 3-15. To capture a star trail image like this one of the Pleiades constellation sometimes called the Seven Sisters , you...

Scrolling Through the Lightbox

At most, the Lightbox shows only a few dozen thumbnails at a time to see more, you need to scroll. Picasa's scroll bar Figure 5-12 works differently from the standard Windows scroll bar. In the middle of the scroll bar is a single button with arrows pointing up and down. Drag the button, and the Lightbox scrolls through your photos. The farther you drag the button away from the center, the faster the thumbnails scroll by. When you release the button, it snaps back to the middle as though it's...

Bulb mode for extended shutter times

When using film cameras, photographers rely on the camera's B setting, in combination with a cable release a shutter button on the end of a cord . The B setting short for bulb keeps the shutter open for as long as you hold down the release. Many a photographer has stood out in the cold, thumbs pressing down on icy cable releases, softly counting One thousand one, one thousand two, one thousand three Your digital camera probably doesn't have a B setting although a few do have Bulb modes . But...

Getting Photos Online with Shutterfly

Shutterfly is an online photo service that lets you store, share, and print your digital snapshots. Shutterfly gives you three ways to upload pictures. You can transfer photos one-by-one using your Web browser. With the help of a browser plug-in, known as the Picture Upload Assistant, you can upload several photos at once. Shutterfly also provides a standalone utility program called Shutterfly Express, which you can use to perform minor edits and then upload photos with a few clicks. Note At...

Strategies to Protect Your Photos

Photos from your digital camera may not fade, crumble, or turn yellow like your grandfather's old prints, but they're vulnerable in a different kind of way. Digital photo files are nothing more than a series of 0s and 1s stored in a particular order. They only last as long as whatever media they're stored on, and CDs, DVDs, and hard drives are just chunks of plastic and metal that are vulnerable to water, fire, accidental erasure, and breakage. Scared yet Good. Here's rule number one for...

Taking the picture

Once you've set up your inanimate subject and have the lighting just right, here's how to set up your camera for the shot Adjust your camera's white balance for the type of light you're using Section 3.2.2.3 . Uncorrected incandescent lights produce an overly warm reddish cast flash tends to produce images a bit on the cool bluish side. A tripod helps keep the camera in precise position. If your camera has a manual-focus mode, use it to lock the focus on the object's area that's most important...

Composition Explained

Composition is the arrangement of your picture the interplay between foreground and background, the way the subject fills the frame, the way the parts of the picture relate to each other, and so on. Before pressing the shutter, veteran photographers compose pictures by asking themselves a few questions Will the shot be clearer, better, or more interesting if you move closer What about walking around to the other side of the action, or zooming in slightly, or letting tall grass fill the...

Forcing the flash to fire

The solution to the situation in Figure 3-9 is to force the flash ona very common trick. If you're close enough to the subject, then the flash provides fill light to balance the subject's exposure with that of the surrounding background, as you can see in the bottom photo. If you're using your on-camera flash, stand within about eight feet of the subject so you can get enough flash for a proper exposure. The fill-in flash can dramatically improve outdoor portraits. It eliminates the silhouette...

Star Trails

If you really want to impress your friends with your budding photographic skills, try capturing star trails. Surely you've seen these dramatic shots one star, located in the center of the frame, remains a point of light, but all the other stars in the universe seem to carve concentric circle segments around it, as though the galaxy were spinning dizzily. That one fixed star, in case you were wondering, is the North Star. It remains steady as all the other stars seem to travel in a circular path...

Image Stabilizer Vibration Reduction

The hot new feature for 20062007 is built-in image stabilization. This feature, available in a flood of new camera models, improves your photos' clarity by ironing out your little hand jiggles. It's an enormous help in three situations when you're zoomed in all the way which magnifies jitters , in low light meaning that the shutter stays open a long time, increasing the likelihood of blurring , and when your camera doesn't have an eyepiece viewfinder forcing you to hold the camera at arm's...

Trailing Car Lights

You've seen this shot on postcards and in magazines neon bands of light streaking across the frame, with a nicely lit bridge or building in the background. The trick to these shots is to keep the shutter open long enough for the cars to pass all the way from one side of the frame to the other Figure 3-14 . Figure 3-14. Don't wait until complete darkness for this type of shot, or your sky will go pitch black. Twilight is the best time to Figure 3-14. Don't wait until complete darkness for this...

Apply the Rule of Thirds

Most people assume that the center of the frame should contain the most important element of your shot. In fact, 98 percent of all amateur photos feature the subject of the shot in dead center. For the most visually interesting shots, however, dead center is actually the least compelling location for the subject. Rather, artists and psychologists have found that the rule of thirds Figure 2-1 ensures better visual balance. Figure 2-1. Top When shooting a head and shoulder portrait, frame the...

Creating Panoramas

How many times have you showed a travel picture to a friend and remarked, It looked a lot bigger in real life That's because it was bigger, and your camera couldn't capture it all. Capturing a vast landscape with a digital camera is like looking at the Grand Canyon through a paper-towel tube. Digital camera makers have created an ingenious solution to widen this narrow view of life panorama mode Figure 1-8 . With it, you can stitch together a series of individual images to create a single,...

Creating a flattering effect with rim lighting

Model Face

Once you've experimented with fill-in flash Section 3.2.1.3 , try a variation that pros use to create striking portraits rim lighting. Position the subject with her back to the sun preferably when it's high in the sky and not shining directly into your camera lens . Now set your camera to fire the flash the lightning bolt, not the automatic setting . If the sun is shining into the lens, block it using your hand or a lens shade. The first thing you'll notice is that the sun creates a rim light...

Creating Flattering Headshots

In professional portrait photographs, everyone looks great. Surely photographers use some kind of tricksancient, carefully guarded trade secretsto make Uncle Ernie look so distinguished and handsome. On the contrary, there are no fancy secrets to great headshots. You can make any subject or any uncle look his best by applying the simple principles in this section whenever you shoot someone from the shoulders up. You can take good portraits even if you have the cheapest camera on the planet. But...

Burst Mode for Rapid Fire Shooting

When you press the shutter button on a typical digital camera, the image begins a long tour through the camera's guts. First, the lens projects the image onto an electronic sensora CCD Charge-Coupled Device or CMOS Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor . Second, the sensor dumps the image temporarily into the camera's built-in memory a memory buffer . Finally, the camera's circuitry feeds the image from its memory buffer onto the memory card. You may be wondering about that second step. Why...

Optical Viewfinder

Every year, digital camera screens get bigger. That's a welcome trend, because framing your photos and, later, showing them off to other people is a heck of a lot more satisfying when they're bigger than a postage stamp. These days, though, some screens fill the whole back of the cameraand leave no room for an optical viewfinder the little glass hole you can peek through . Plenty of people are perfectly happy composing their shots on the screen, but remember that holding a camera up to your...

Pointand Shoot or Single Lens Reflex

What type of photographer are you Do you always have a camera in your pocket or purse so you can pull it out for quick shots at work or at the ball park Or are you a photographer who loves toting around lots of gear and enjoys having the best tools for the job Do tripods and macro-lenses sound like fun to you Pro aspirations anyone Answers to these questions point you toward the digital camera of your dreams. Your camera should become a natural extension of your vision. If you and your camera...

Image Resolution and Memory Capacity

The first number you see in a digital camera description is its megapixel rating. A pixel short for picture element is one tiny colored dot, one of the thousands or millions that compose a single digital photograph. One megapixel equals one million pixels. You can't escape learning this term, since pixels are everything in computer graphics. The number of megapixels your camera has determines the quality of your pictures' resolution the amount of detail that appears . A 5-megapixel camera, for...