APS films and cameras

The Advanced Photo System (APS) is a film format introduced in 1996. APS films are only 24 mm wide, giving negatives slightly over half the area of pictures on 35 mm film (see page 51). They do not fit 35 mm cameras, and so a whole range of scaled down cameras from compacts to single lens reflex designs have been introduced for APS photography. They are similar in price to 35 mm equipment.

Other information passed from an APS camera via the film to the lab can also cover the lighting used for each individual shot, and time and date of shooting (ink printed on the back of your photo). APS films and equipment therefore offer many conveniences, but for large prints they do not match 35 mm in final image quality. There is a much wider choice of film types available in 35 mm size, and this larger format is also less costly to have processed than APS.

Figure 10.5 APS (Advanced Photo System) catridge (left) and 35 mm film cassette (right).

APS cartridge 35mm cassette

Figure 10.5 APS (Advanced Photo System) catridge (left) and 35 mm film cassette (right).

APS film comes in an oval-shaped cartridge (Figure 10.5) that, when inside the camera, opens and pushes out the leading edge of the film to automatically load it. After the last shot is taken the film rewinds automatically and you hand in the cassette for processing. APS film carries a transparent magnetic coating used to record information from your camera to instruct the processing laboratory machinery. For example, a picture shape setting on your camera allows selection of either 'H' format (4:3 ratio), 'widescreen' (9:16 ratio), 'classic' format (2:3, the same height-to-width ratio as 35 mm) or a longer, narrower 'panoramic' 1:3 ratio. This causes the lab printer to crop the particular picture to the shape you selected when framing up your shot.

Figure 10.6 Inserting and loading a 35 mm film into a manual or auto-loading camera. Manual loading instructions: (1) Pull out rewind knob and lay cassette in film chamber. Replace knob. (2) Push film tip fully into take-up spool slot. (3) Wind over enough film to bring both sets of perforations onto teeth. (4) Close camera and wind on two frames before starting to shoot. Auto-loading instructions: (1) Insert film cassette (motor-driven cameras have no rewind knob). (2) Pull out enough film to lay across and touch far end. (3) Close the camera back. The window in the back allows you to read film data off the cassette. (4) Closing triggers film advance and the counter moves from S to 1.

Figure 10.6 Inserting and loading a 35 mm film into a manual or auto-loading camera. Manual loading instructions: (1) Pull out rewind knob and lay cassette in film chamber. Replace knob. (2) Push film tip fully into take-up spool slot. (3) Wind over enough film to bring both sets of perforations onto teeth. (4) Close camera and wind on two frames before starting to shoot. Auto-loading instructions: (1) Insert film cassette (motor-driven cameras have no rewind knob). (2) Pull out enough film to lay across and touch far end. (3) Close the camera back. The window in the back allows you to read film data off the cassette. (4) Closing triggers film advance and the counter moves from S to 1.

100 Photography Tips

100 Photography Tips

To begin with your career in photography at the right path, you need to gather more information about it first. Gathering information would provide you guidance on the right steps that you need to take. Researching can be done through the internet, talking to professional photographers, as well as reading some books about the subject. Get all the tips from the pros within this photography ebook.

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Responses

  • michela
    How to load film into automatic camera?
    1 year ago
  • aydin
    How to load film to a manual camera?
    8 months ago

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