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Pentax K10D, 18-55mm, 0.3secs atf/11, ISO 100

has most likely adjusted his Levels, but I think using Curves, with a steep slope in the centre, might be better. I would also have turned the lamp so that the cord isn't visible. It's easy to hide it.

I like the colours, too, with their nice warm tungsten atmosphere.

Many would have shot the whole room, but David has isolated a section of the scene to tell a more personal story, and that's why this is my Picture of the Week.

Table lamp

David Reynolds

Pentax K10D, 18-55mm, 0.3secs atf/11, ISO 100

David's wife sets him challenges to photograph household objects. He's very lucky: my wife sets me challenges to decorate rooms.

For this picture he wanted to capture the detail of the chair, while avoiding burning out the lamp shade. This is obviously a bit tricky given the level of contrast in the scene, but he could have used a reflector to bounce some of that light back to the chair The newspaper that came with the supplement would have been fine to use for this.

I don't think David need to worry too much, though, because the picture he has taken is very good. It could do with just a tiny bit more contrast in the midtones as they are a little flat. David

If William had waited for this man to move closer to the camera (as shown here in this mock-up) then he would have created a more definite subject

Damien's Picture of the Week wins 6x Fujifilm Sensia 100,3x Fujifilm Superia 400,3x Fujifilm Previa 100 or a Fujifilm 26B media card (in a choice of CF, SD, xD or Memory Stick). The two runners-up win 3x Fujifilm Sensia 100. Please indicate in your letter if you would like Fujifilm film or a memory card (and type) and include your postal address and image details.

See your pictures in print

Damien's Picture of the Week wins 6x Fujifilm Sensia 100,3x Fujifilm Superia 400,3x Fujifilm Previa 100 or a Fujifilm 26B media card (in a choice of CF, SD, xD or Memory Stick). The two runners-up win 3x Fujifilm Sensia 100. Please indicate in your letter if you would like Fujifilm film or a memory card (and type) and include your postal address and image details.

Finding a focal point

There is so much going on in William's Nepali street scene that its difficult to know where to look first. As a consequence, I can't really tell what William wanted the subject to be. The picture really needs a focal point, so we know where to start. Had he waited just a few seconds, the two men walking towards him would have become larger in the frame and then, naturally, the subjects of the shot. We'd still have all the great things to look at, but an idea of where to start.

I've picked out seven separate scenes in the shot that fight for prominence, but it's up to the photographer to make that decision for the viewer.

Bhantapua, Nepal

William Courage

Nikon D200.12-24mm, 1/180sec at f/7.1, ISO 160

This is an image that needs to be seen big because it's one you can sit and look at for ages. In fact, it's difficult to know what we're supposed to see. There are multiple subjects you could look at in this shot, and it's almost like William could see that this was a really interesting scene, but couldn't decide what he wanted us to look at. The main problem is that there's a lot of space in the foreground on the right. If William had waited for the man with the bike, or the man walking, to draw nearer to the camera and fill that foreground space, then we could have had one of these two men as the subject set in the context of their surroundings.

It's great using a wideangle lens in street scenes because you can fit in so much detail, but the flip side is that you have to get close, otherwise everything ends up too small in the frame. An alternative approach might have been to stand where he was but to use a longer lens and zoom in to, for instance, the family in the left of the frame, with the window and brick wall as a background. When I look around this scene there are lots of individual shots that I'd like to walk up to and examine more closely, and I've shown some suggested crops (right) to illustrate the different scenes that were available.

I know why William stood back to take this picture -1 do it, too. When you're in an unfamiliar place, you stick out like a sore thumb, and it can feel intimidating so you don't want to go up close to people It's what you have to do, though, otherwise you end up with a series of general shots that don't communicate very well with the viewer Pictures do need a subject and viewers need that guidance.

If William had waited for this man to move closer to the camera (as shown here in this mock-up) then he would have created a more definite subject

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