GIMPs Program Windows

When you first open GIMP, three separate windows appear on the desktop. The Toolbox (or Tools palette) with the tool settings, an initially empty image window, and a window called Dock with windows called dialogs for administrating layers and various other choices (above the dock with the tabbed dialogs Layers, Channels,Paths, Undo, and below the dock with Brushes, Patterns, Gradients). These three dialogs are represented by tabs in the dock. Clicking a tab opens the corresponding dialog. However, these dialogs can be pulled out from the dock by drag & drop. Then they are displayed as separate windows on the desktop. The main windows (Toolbox, image window and dock) are distributed openly across the desktop. Every window creates its own entry in the taskbar, which requires a little getting used to. Furthermore, the taskbar starts filling up as more pictures are being edited.

This problem was accounted for in the new GIMP 2.6. The user can set up GIMP so that the image window serves as the background window.

The Toolbox and the dock are placed on the background together with the frame, taking up only one tab on the taskbar. You can find this setting by choosing Edit > Preferences > Window Management. Choose Window Manager Hints: Utility Window and then save by clicking Save Window Positions Now. After restarting GIMP and maximizing your image window, you can place your Toolbox and the dock on the image window. This technique works on Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X since GIMP 2.6.2. All three windows are visible on a single button of your taskbar or your Windows Manager. However, GIMP hasn't been developed completely, so the Toolbox and the dock are not minimized when the image window is minimized. At least, this is true for the Windows version of GIMP.

Gimp Windows Toolbox

Figure 1.14

The program windows after the first start on Windows Vista. In the current version, GIMP 2.6.8, three separate windows open: the image window, the Toolbox with a selection of tools and the docked Tool settings, and the dock with the Layers, Channels, Paths, and Undo windows in the upper row and the Brushes, Patterns, and Gradients windows below.

Figure 1.14

The program windows after the first start on Windows Vista. In the current version, GIMP 2.6.8, three separate windows open: the image window, the Toolbox with a selection of tools and the docked Tool settings, and the dock with the Layers, Channels, Paths, and Undo windows in the upper row and the Brushes, Patterns, and Gradients windows below.

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Figure 1.15

The Preferences window (Edit > Preferences) with the selection and setting for Window Management. This allows you to set the image window as your background window.

Figure 1.15

The Preferences window (Edit > Preferences) with the selection and setting for Window Management. This allows you to set the image window as your background window.

When you start GIMP, you will see three windows. The first window to the left is the Toolbox. The Toolbox actually consists of two windows: the top half is allotted to the Toolbox with the various tools and the lower half to the individual tools' settings respectively Tool Options. This section can be closed and reopened later as a separate window. It also can be reattached to the Toolbox again.

The image window in the middle is empty when you start GIMP. Since version 2.6, it contains all the menus. You will also find all menus in the context menu, which can be opened with the right mouse button. To shut down GIMP, you use the image window's close button. This shut-down function is also allotted to the Toolbox.

1.5 GET GIMP RUNNING

Figure 1.16

You can set up GIMP so that all windows are open in the background window. Note that there will be only one tab for the image window when you have set it up as the background window.

Figure 1.16

You can set up GIMP so that all windows are open in the background window. Note that there will be only one tab for the image window when you have set it up as the background window.

The third window is the so-called dock. To be precise, the window has two sections. The top section has four tabs where the Layers, Channels, Paths, and the Undo History dialog boxes can be opened. Below that you will find the tabs for the Paintbrush, Patterns, and Gradients dialog boxes. You can drag these with your mouse onto your desktop. As a matter of fact, you can customize the windows to fit your needs. You can open new tab windows from the Windows menu, drag them along to the dock and insert them as new tabs. You may even quit the dock completely by closing it and add the tabs you need to the Tool Options window. You may either simply drag the tabs o

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you need from the dock, before closing it, or you click on the tiny little arrow symbol on the right of the Tool Options window and choose the desired tabs from Add Tab. And if your GIMP starts looking too weird, you can always reset everything to default by opening Edit > Preferences: Window Management and clicking Reset Saved Window Positions to Default Values. Then just restart your GIMP and it's as fresh as on the first day.

Figure 1.17

The submenu Add Tab, opened from the Tool Options window

Figure 1.17

The submenu Add Tab, opened from the Tool Options window

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  • lea
    What is gimp background window 2011?
    6 years ago

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