The solution here was to bounce my flash off the wall to my righthand side

The challenge here was hiding the photographer and the camera and not creating visible hot-spots from the area the flash was bounced off. (settings 1 50 second, f 2.8, 800 ISO FEC +0.7 EV flash gelled with 12 CTS) Adding directional bounce flash on our model, the light on our subject opens up and gives a flattering portrait. Once again, our light is coming from the side, giving form to our model's face in a way that flash bounced from directly overhead would not have (plate 11-18)....

Direction Intensity and Color Balance

In our pursuit to seamlessly blend our flash lighting with available light, we need to be aware of the direction of our light, the intensity of our flash (i.e., how much flash we're adding to the available light), and our color balance. Direction. The direction from which we add our lighting will heavily dictate our results. With directional lighting, we mean light that comes in from an angle other than directly from the camera's viewpoint. Directional lighting will give us that interplay...

First Curtain vs Second Curtain Sync

Sync Flash

The timing of when the flash is triggered can be changed in relation to which curtain (first or second) is about to move. We can either trigger our flash at the start of the exposure interval, when the first curtain has just cleared the sensor, or near the end of the exposure interval when the second curtain is just about to start to move. When we use slow shutter speeds, the decision as to when the flash should be triggered can have a pronounced effect on how the flash appears in our image....

Also made sure to shield my flash from my subjects

See in the next image (plate 13-2), where I bounced flash forward and to the right of me at a point on the ceiling that was same distance to both of them. (Note I also made sure to shield my flash from my subjects. Remember anytime your subject can see your flash head or your flash diffuser, then you have direct flash. I used a piece of black foam to prevent any light from the flash from falling directly on them.) I should note that we have another advantage here more directional light. This...

My Choice of Flash Modifiers

When using devices to modify the output from my on-camera flash, I try to keep close to that fundamental principle in lighting the larger your light source, the softer your light. Using any of the myriad flash modifiers on the market today will help in achieving that softer light. These modifiers spread the light from the on-cam-era speedlight much wider than it would otherwise be, making it much softer light than direct flash would be. However and this is a big however these flash modifiers...

High Speed Flash Sync

Fortunately, this flash-sync problem is nearly impossible to get with a modern dedicated speedlight. The intelligence built into the camera and flashgun system doesn't allow this to happen. When the camera detects the dedicated speedlight, the camera will either stop the shutter speed from going higher than maximum flash-sync speed, or will switch to high-speed flash-sync. In this mode, instead of a near-instantaneous burst of light, the flashgun emits a slower, pulsed light. The light from the...

This contrast reduction can be achieved by bouncing flash into the room

In a sequence of photographs of a model I would certainly keep these, but I would also want to give a more flattering portrait by reducing the contrast. This contrast reduction can be achieved by bouncing flash into the room to lift the shadow areas. The next series of images (plates 5-21 to 5-24) shows the effect of this technique, bouncing flash into the room off part of the ceiling and various random objects in the room. It is very important that the flash head is...

Controlling Light Falloff

Light falloff, which is how we describe the way that the light from your speedlight recedes to the background, is easily observed in photographs. We've all seen how people in the foreground are brighter than people in the background. Not only can we easily see this in photos, but light falloff is one of those things that just make sense when we think about it the further you move from a light source, the dimmer the light will be. When we use an on-camera flash, this means our backgrounds will...

Some flash modifiers also offer a solution for warming up your flash

Tungsten Light With Different Gels

The color temperature of the speedlight is around 5400K. While the actual number value might have little meaning to many photographers, it does mean that light from a flashgun will look a lot cooler than the tungsten incandescent light does. That warm glow of tungsten light, which is around 2800K but varies a lot in actual value, makes the flash appear too cold, or too blue. However, if you simply adjust your white balance so that the flash appears neutral, your background will go a murky...

Table of Contents

ABOUT THE MATERIAL IN THIS BOOK 6 An Easy The WHERE DO WE START 8 1. What We Want To Achieve 8 2. Looking At The Available Light 9 3. A Few Essential Concepts 10 The Softer the Light 10 Direction, Intensity, and Color Balance 10 Direction 10 Color Balance 11 Postproduction of the Image 12 White-Balance WB Settings 12 Manual Flash vs. TTL Auto Flash 12 4. Choosing Equipment 13 Choosing a Flashgun 13 Battery Packs 13 Flash THE TECHNICAL STUFF 15 5. Exposure Metering 15 Why Manual Exposure Mode 15...