Scott Kelby

If you're shooting outdoors, take a tip from the pros and don't change lenses if you're in a dusty environment. That's the last thing you want getting down inside your digital camera, and although you can't sometimes see the dust swirling around you, your camera's sensors will see it, and then so will you (when you open the photos on your computer). If you must change lenses, try to go back to your car, or some indoor location, and switch lenses there. Remember, it doesn't take a whole lotta...

Bill Fortiney

Hey, before we get to The Real Secret to Getting Sharp Photos, I need to let you in on a few quick things that will help you big time in getting the most from this book (sorry about duping you with The Real Secret to Getting Sharp Photos headline, but don't worrythat subject and more are coming right up, but first I have to make sure you totally understand how this book works. Then it will all make sense and we can worry about sharp photos). The idea is simple you and I are out on a photo...

Istockphotojasen Leathers

With sports photography, most of the time you're going to want to stop the action, and to do that you'll have to switch to shutter priority mode (or manual mode if you're comfortable with it), and then shoot at a speed of at least 1 640 of a second (or faster) to stop the motion and keep your image sharp. The slowest you can generally get away with is 1 500 of a second, but that's iffy. Go with 1 640 or higher for better results (there are times when you're going to intentionally want to shoot...

Getting Soft Diffused Light with Flash Part

The other method of getting soft, diffused, and better yet, directional light using a flash (the key word here is directional, because it keeps your flash shots from looking flat) works if you're using an external flash unit (and not the built-in flash on your camera, which is pretty limited, as you'll soon see). The advantage of an external flash unit is that you can change the angle and direction of the flash. The reason this is cool is that instead of aiming your flash right into your...

Randy Hufford

Press your shutter button halfway down to set your exposure, then look in your viewfinder and make note of the f-stop and shutter speed. Now switch your camera to manual mode and dial in that f-stop and shutter speed. If you don't, and you shoot in an auto exposure mode of any kind, your exposure may (will) change for one or more of the segments, and this will drive you insane when working in Photoshop. 6. Once you focus on the first segment, turn off auto focus for your lens. That way, your...

Avoid Increasing Your ISO Even in Dim Light

When you're shooting on a tripod in dim or low light, don't increase your ISO your digital equivalent of film speed . Keep your ISO at the lowest ISO setting your camera allows ISO 200, 100, or 50, if your camera's ISO goes that low, as shown on the Nikon menu above for the sharpest, cleanest photos. Raising the ISO adds noise to your photos, and you don't want that of course, if you're hand-holding and have no choice, like when shooting a wedding in the low lighting of a church, then...

Peggy Guenzel

Okay, that headline doesn't sound great when you say it out loud it sounds like we're actually shooting wildlife with a gun, rather than taking photos , but it's right on the money. When you're shooting wildlife photography, your point of focus needs to be the animal's eyes. If they're not in focus, it doesn't matter what else is. Oftentimes you'll be capturing wildlife in motion or in flight, as the case may be , and that's where it's especially important to make certain the eyes are in focus....

Chapter Two Shooting Flowers Like a

You're probably surprised to see a chapter in here about shooting flowers because flowers seem like they'd be easy to shoot, right I mean, they're just sitting therenot moving. They're colorful. They're already interesting, and people love looking at them. It should be a total no-brainer to get a good flower shot. But ya know what It's not. It's a brainer. It's a total brainer. Ya know why It's because of pollination. That's right, it's the pollination that naturally occurs in nature that puts...

Turn on The Blinkies to Keep More Detail

Okay, they're technically not called the blinkies that's our nickname for them , they're actually called highlight warnings or highlight alerts and having this turned on, and adjusting for it, is a critical part of getting properly exposed landscape shots. This warning shows exactly which parts of your photo have been overexposed to the point that there's no detail in those areas at all. You'll be amazed at how often this happens. For example, even on an overcast day, clouds can blow out turn...

Istockphotojan Paul Schrage

If you've ever had a chance to photograph something like the California redwood trees or a huge rock formation out in Utah's Monument Valley, you've probably been disappointed that when you looked at those photos later, you lost all sense of their size. In person, those redwoods were wider around than a truck. In your photos, they could've been the regular pines in your backyard, because they lost their sense of size. That's why, when trying to show the size of an object, you need something in...

Bill Fortney

Okay, so now you know that as a pro landscape shooter your life is going to be like this you get up before dawn, and you miss dinner about every evening remember, there's no shame in coming to dinner late . If you're okay with all that, then it's time to tell you the other harsh realitysince you'll be shooting in low light all the time, you'll be shooting on a tripod all the time. Every time. Always. There is no hand-holding in the professional landscape photography world. Now, I must warn you,...

Shoot at Your Lens Sharpest Aperture

Another trick the pros use is, when possible, shoot at your lens' sharpest aperture. For most lenses, that is about two full stops smaller than wide open so the f-stop number you use will go higher by two stops . For example, if you had an f 2.8 lens, the sharpest apertures for that lens would be f 5.6 and f 8 two full stops down from 2.8 . Of course, you can't always choose these apertures, but if you're in a situation where you can and we'll talk about this later in the book , then shooting...

Getting Tack Sharp Starts with a Tripod

There's not just one trick that will give you the sharp photos the pros getit's a combination of things that all come together to give you tack sharp shots. Tack sharp is the term pro photographers use to describe the ultimate level of sharpness. Sadly, we aren't the best at coming up with highly imaginative names for things. So, while there are a number of things you'll need to do to get tack-sharp photos, the most important is shooting on a tripod. In fact, if there's one single thing that...

Chapter One Pro Tips for Getting Really Sharp Photos

If Your Photos Aren't Sharp, the Rest Doesn't Matter Having photos that are sharp and in focus is so vitally important to pro photographers that they actually have coined a term for them. They call them tack sharp. When I first heard that term tossed around years ago, I naturally assumed that it was derived from the old phrase sharp as a tack, but once I began writing this book and doing some serious research into its history, I was shocked and surprised at what I found. First of all, it's not...

Other Books By Scott Kelby

The Photoshop CS2 Book for Digital Photographers The Adobe Lightroom eBook for Digital Photographers InDesign CS CS2 Killer Tips Mac OS X Tiger Killer Tips Getting Started with Your Mac and Mac OS X Tiger Scott is Editor-in-Chief and Publisher of Photoshop User magazine, Editor-in-Chief of Nikon Software User magazine, Editor and Publisher of Layers magazine the how-to magazine for everything Adobe , and co-host of the popular weekly video show Adobe Photoshop TV . Scott is President and...