Creating a Duotone

We'll start by creating a duotone. Tritones, quadtones, etc. are merely a matter of adding more colors. Find gangsters.pcx on your CD-ROM and then follow along with these steps. The original image is shown in Figure 9.15.

Figure 9.15. These ugly mobsters seem to be seated in a Roaring 20's parlor

Figure 9.15. These ugly mobsters seem to be seated in a Roaring 20's parlor

Open the gangsters.pcx file and choose Image > Mode > Duotone to convert it to full color. The Duotone Options dialog box, shown in Figure 9.16, appears.

Figure 9.16. Set your Duotone options

Figure 9.16. Set your Duotone options

2. The Type box shows Monotone, which is what the grayscale image currently is. Note that the Ink columns under the Type box shows only one ink being used, black. Choose Duotone from the Type box. (Tritone and Quadtone are also available here for when you decide to get fancy.) A second Ink row becomes active. You can now choose the two inks that you want to use. You can choose gray ink to accompany the black to produce an ordinary duotone. We're going to colorize the image by using two inks, neither of which is black. The box in the second column shows the current ink chosen. In the second row, because no ink has been chosen yet, that box is white and the name of the ink in the third column is blank.

Click in the white box to summon the Custom Colors dialog box, shown in Figure 9.17. There are lots of things to choose from this dialog box, so I'll go over them one by one.

Figure 9.17. Choose your colors here

Figure 9.17. Choose your colors here

• Under Book (so called because printers use books of swatch samples for reference), you'll find a bewildering array of names of color models. These represent standard spot color inks printers can choose from. Their clients can specify a particular color by name, and the printer will know what is meant. Not all printers use all these systems. In fact, many standardize on Pantone's various offerings. There are others, such as ANPA (American Newspaper Publisher's Association) and the Trumatch system. Pantone's default colors come up, so that's what we'll use.

• Underneath the Book list are a series of color swatches, showing a scrolling list of color choices. The list is very long, and the particular range of colors you are looking at is shown by a marker in the color slider to the right of the swatches.

• The color slider can be moved to quickly change to the range of colors you want to use. Click the arrows at top or bottom to move quickly through the spectrum, or move the slider arrows themselves. You can also begin typing the name of the color, if you know it, to jump quickly to that color (try typing Red, Green, or Blue to see what happens).

• The current color and the patch you've selected are shown in swatches to the right of the color slider, and the values for the color model are listed underneath that.

• There's a Picker button you can click if you'd rather use the Photoshop Color Picker to choose a color. However, your choice will not correspond to one of the standard colors from one of the books and their swatches, so you would not be able to print your image using those standard colors.

4. I chose Pantone 1495 C for the highlight color for my duotone, as I wanted to create a sepia-toned image. You can choose another color if you want.

5. Click OK to apply the hue. At this point, the image is shown in black and sepia-orange.

That's a good choice, because the black provides the detail and the sepia adds the color effect. Choosing another color to replace black, even a very dark brown, yields a washedout effect with not enough detail. In Figure 9.18, the left half is shown in black and sepia, whereas the right side is dark brown and sepia. Not nearly as nice an effect, you'll agree.

Figure 9.18. At left, black and sepia; at right, dark brown and sepia; Obviously balck is needed for detail!

Figure 9.18. At left, black and sepia; at right, dark brown and sepia; Obviously balck is needed for detail!

However, you can control the amount of each ink applied to the image by using the Duotone Curve dialog box (shown in Figure 9.19) that pops up when you click in the first column next to each ink's row. You can make any of the changes you would using Photoshop's ordinary Curves command, except the tonal modifications apply only to the particular ink you are adjusting. Don't worry about fooling with the Curves if you don't have experience using this command; in most cases, the default values work fine. Our finished duotone is shown in Figure 9.20.

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Adobe Photoshop can be a complex tool only because you can do so much with it, however for in this video series, we're going to keep it as simple as possible. In fact, in this video you'll see an overview of the few tools and Adobe Photoshop features we will use. When you see this video, you'll see how you can do so much with so few features, but you'll learn how to use them in depth in the future videos.

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