Underneath

Select a color, such as green for the leaves, or yellow for the flower centers, from the Swatches palette. Click the down arrow next to the Brush icon in the Options bar and choose a small, fuzzy brush from the array shown in Figure 9.25. (The top row shows hard-edged brushes the soft-edged brushes start in the second row.) You might want to start with a 9- or 13-pixel-wide brush.

The Matching Game

Unless you're deliberately creating a fantasy image that is supposed to have a surrealistic look, you'll always want the portions of your images that you are combining to match as closely as possible. Mismatches of lighting, texture, perspective, or any of a dozen other factors is a dead giveaway that an image is a composite. Although it's unlikely that you'll learn to create an image that will fool a forensic scientist, you can still create composites that are believable on first glance,...

Figure 83 Boosting the contrast doesnt make the colors any more accurate

What went wrong We were led astray by thinking that the apparent differences in tone between parts of the costume were determined only by the relationship between the light and dark tones of our converted grayscale image. In the real world, the hue (color), saturation (richness), and brightness of the tones determine the apparent contrast that we see in color. When hue and saturation are removed from an image by converting it to grayscale, all we're left with is the relative brightness of the...

Figure 77 Lighten the eyes using the Levels control

If you want, use the Image > Adjustments > Hue Saturation command to change the color of the eyes. Just use the Hue slider until you get the color you want. 7. When working on the eyes, we noticed that they had unnatural-looking double catchlights (caused by the two light sources used to take the portrait). Use the Clone Stamp tool to blot out the brighter of the two catchlights, on the right side of the pupil. 8. As a finishing touch, I'm going to show you a quick way to disguise a...

Figure 728 The romantic glow looks like this

Here's an alternative method that produces a different look 1. Instead of following the previous steps, take the same image and enter Quick Mask mode. 2. Choose a very large, fuzzy brush, one that's large enough to cover the face with one stroke (press the right bracket key until the brush grows large enough you'll be well over 1000 pixels). 3. Dab a selection that covers the face, and then exit Quick Mask mode. 4. Press Shift+Ctrl Command+I to invert the selection, so that everything in the...

Evening Out the Clouds

At this point, your retouched image looks similar to Figure 6.7. The dust and utility poles are gone, the dust has been removed, and now the unevenness of the clouds stands out. Figure 6.7. So far, so good. But we could use some more clouds in the upper-left corner Figure 6.7. So far, so good. But we could use some more clouds in the upper-left corner The picture might look better with a few extra clouds wafting over the upper-left portion of the image. We could add the clouds by cloning the...

Creating Great Grayscale Photos from Color

It's a long day's journey into black-and-white. And the trip back is even worse. However, it never fails. You've got a really great picture, but it's black-and-white. How do you add color that isn't there Or, you may have a color image and would prefer a grayscale rendition. That, at least, sounds easyuntil you try it. If you want to convert a good color photo into a bad black-and-white image, or a great grayscale picture into a terrible-looking colorization, you can do the job in minutes. In...

Figure 1022 Apply Gaussian blur to eliminate the halftone screen

Move the Radius slider to the right until the halftone pattern is blurred. I used a value of 1.7 pixels. Click OK to apply the blur. 5. Next, choose Filter > Sharpen > Unsharp Mask to restore some of the image's sharpness now that the pattern has been eliminated. 6. Move the Amount slider to the right to sharpen the image. A setting of about 175 percent fixes the image without making the photo appear unnaturally sharp or with too much contrast. 7. Click OK to apply the sharpness. 8. Choose...

Resurrecting an Old Tintype

Every once in awhile, you'll encounter a photo that's almost certainly lost to the ravages of time, so that little of the original image remains. The old tintype shown in Figure 10.14 is such an example. If I'd found it at a garage sale, I probably would not have given it a second look. Tintypes, also known as ferrotypes, aren't particularly rare. They aren't made on tin, either. The process was introduced in 1853. It was fast and cheap, and tintypes were rugged. The process was outmoded by the...

Cloning Patching and Healing

The science of cloning has been in the news lately as scientists discover ways to make reasonably exact copies of living creatures. If you think the process of inducing cells from donor organisms to develop as an embryo is complex, try cloningcopying image pixels from one place to anotherin Photoshop sometime. Pixels can be more frustrating to work with than cells, and your end results will be evaluated considerably more rigorously. After all, the creators of Dolly were happy just to get a...

Adding an Eerie Spotlight Effect

I'm going to show you how to create a cool, stark spotlight effect you can apply to many different images. Here, it will look as if an enemy base on the moon is using a laser or other weapon to attack the castle. 1. Switch to the layer with the castle on it (the poor castle has been neglected so long, it's feeling lonely) and enter Quick Mask mode. Use a fuzzy brush to paint a diagonal selection of the castle that's facing the moon. The area you need to grab is shown in Figure 14.13. Figure...

Removing a Halftone Screen

Halftone Scanner

We looked at removing a halftone screen earlier in this book, in terms of uses for blurring and sharpening. However, trying to get decent photos from halftones can be a serious concern. Sometimes, the only existing version of a photo may be a halftoned version. That can be a problem. In Chapter 9, you learned a bit about the limitations of printing photographs in newspapers, magazines, and books. As a refresher, keep in mind that for a black-and-white image, every tone you see must be...

Retouching and Compositing from 50000 Feet

One of the most important and often overlooked developments of the computer age is the ability of Photoshop, and image editing tools like it, to subtly (or dramatically) alter the appearance of images we view. Today, we're so accustomed to assuming that a startling image may have been photoshopped that we sometimes forget that sayings like Seeing is believing once held a solid grain of truth. Photographs in supermarket tabloids of farmers wrestling with pig-sized grasshoppers and images of the...

How Color Works

In one sense, color is just a way of referring to how human beings react to a very limited portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. Apparently, as our primate ancestors evolved, the ability to differentiate among different colors for example, blood, orange sabre-tooth tigers hiding in green foliage, etc. became a survival trait, and our eyes developed, in addition to the rod cells that are used for fine detail and for black-and-white vision when light levels are low, three different kinds of...

The Origins of Retouching and Compositing

You never really believe a picture is worth 1000 words until somebody starts critiquing one of your beloved photos. Then, the words really seem to pour out Your problems may involve dust spots on a scanned image, defects in your original subject such as skin blemishes or bags under the eyes , like those shown in Figure 1.1, or simply something that appears in a photo that you wish weren't there. Figure 1.1. Bags under the eyes, multiple catchlights in the pupils, or a washed-out eyebrow are all...

Digital

Table of Contents Digital Retouching and Compositing Photographer's Guide Publisher Muska amp Lipman Pub Date 2003 ISBN 1-932094-19-9 Pages 350 Buy Print Version Written from a photographer's point of view, Digital Retouching and Compositing Photographers' Guide solves every snap-shooter's real-life problems painlessly. It distills complex topics down to a few pages of explanation and easy steps so users can quickly and dramatically change the way photos look. The book is divided into three...