Parts of a Digital Camera

Digital cameras vary widely in appearance, but all of them share certain common components. Although the location for individual components may differ slightly, and the camera body may be square, cubical, or rounded, virtually all digital cameras have a taking lens, an optical viewfinder, a color LCD display panel for previewing an image and showing menus, a shutter release, and a clutch of control buttons. Most also have a slot for removable storage, such as SmartMedia or CompactFlash cards a...

Slf

Moir An objectionable pattern caused by the interference of halftone screens, frequently generated by rescanning an image that has already been halftoned. negative A representation of an image in which the tones are reversed. That is, blacks are shown as white, and vice versa, and colors are reversed to their complements. neutral color In RGB mode, a color in which red, green, and blue are present in equal amounts, producing a gray. noise In an image, pixels with randomly distributed color...

Background

For close-up photography in a studio, backgrounds generally should be plain, so they won't detract from the object being photographed. One popular type of background is the so-called seamless backdrop, which combines the surface that the subject rests on and the vertical background behind it, with a smooth, often invisible transition between them. Seamless backgrounds are extremely flexible because you can go for the seamless look or use lighting to provide different amounts of illumination on...

Ggo

Sive, more flexible models are rolled out every month or two. I get dizzy just thinking about how rapidly Nikon has moved from the CoolPix 900 to 950, 990, my own 995, and whatever model made my camera obsolete before this book hit the shelves. If you don't plan to upgrade, you should get a camera that does the job for you at a price you can afford, and otherwise ignore the cost. If you like to upgrade, on the other hand, you'll want to keep in mind that you'll be duplicating your investment in...

Relationship between fstops

It is often useful to understand the relationship between f-stops, especially if you happen to be calculating or adjusting exposure manually. For example, f4 is not twice as large as f8. It's four times as large. The relationship actually is derived from the square root of 2 1.4 , with each whole-number f-stop corresponding roughly to a power of the square root of 2. So, each of the following numbers in the series represents a halving of the amount of light admitted to the sensor as you move...