Views

> Selecting a collection actually represents an initial image selection step, but it is nevertheless useful to separate these two steps - at least in theory.

Once your collection of images reaches a certain size, you will nearly always need to view only a part of your collection: for example, your last shoot, images for a particular customer, vacation 2008, or images that you have rated with two or more stars. We use metadata to set these limits - or better put, to make these choices. A View has two basic components:

► The basic collection that we are looking in (e.g., our last shoot or Wedding_2009)

r One or more filter criteria, such as a period of time, images shot using a particular camera, or IPTC keywords

Selecting images is like putting the basic collection through a filter based on our choices, and that is exactly what Adobe calls its selection tool. Filters can be more or less complex, depending on which application you are using. An example of a complex filter could be: "all images shot in 2008 using a Nikon D300 and a 16mm Nikkor fisheye lens". Individual criteria can be compounded using logical AND/OR operations.

Nearly all image browsers allow you to form views in this or similar ways and, provided that your images are tagged with appropriate metadata, views are the tools that make an image library usable and practical. The file attributes and the EXIF data are "gifts" that are automatically attached to our image files without us having to make any additional effort.

If your image management application is based on a "real" database (as are Apple Aperture, Adobe Lightroom, and Microsoft Expression Media), searching through large numbers of images can be a speedy process. The application imports the image metadata and stores a reference to the image file location but usually leaves the image files themselves stored in their usual location.

Other image browsers store the image metadata in a cache file in order to speed up the search process, or they simply search through all the available image files, which is much slower. If the cache is full, older data is simply deleted and has to be regenerated during the next search.

Most image browsers also allow you to name and save filter sets you use * Lightroom and Aperture have this regularly (all images flagged for deletion, for instance).* functionality, but Bridge doesn't (yet).

20 L003Í3JÍDILT rains - Adobe En dije

20 L003Í3JÍDILT rains - Adobe En dije

Figure 1-36: Using Bridge Filter criteria to define a view. To activate the Filter Panel use Window r Filter Panel. Activating the checkbox includes a metadata item ® in your search criteria. The base collection is selected using the drop-down menu ©, and you can add additional items to the list manually. Bridge will then display only those images that fulfill your selected criteria.

Figure 1-36: Using Bridge Filter criteria to define a view. To activate the Filter Panel use Window r Filter Panel. Activating the checkbox includes a metadata item ® in your search criteria. The base collection is selected using the drop-down menu ©, and you can add additional items to the list manually. Bridge will then display only those images that fulfill your selected criteria.

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