Quieksteps using exposure compensation

1. With the Mode Dial set to any mode in the Creative Zone except manual (M), press the shutter button halfway down to activate the displays, and then hold down the Av/Exposure Compensation button with your thumb as you turn the Main Dial to move the marker on the exposure scale displayed in the viewfinder and on the LCD panel.

■ To darken the image, move the marker toward the minus (-) end of the scale.

■ To lighten the image, move the marker toward the plus (+) end of the scale.

2. When done, reset exposure compensation to 0 otherwise it will be remembered even when you turn off the camera.

AUTOEXPOSURE LOCK (AE)

When the subject you want to expose correctly isn't covered by a focus point, you can lock focus and exposure by pressing the shutter button halfway down and then recompose the image. However, in Creative Zone modes you can also lock exposure separately from locking focus using the AE/FE Lock button (an * asterisk-like icon). This allows you to lock exposure on one subject or scene, and then recompose and refocus the image without the exposure setting changing. When you press the AE/FE Lock button the camera uses partial metering to set the exposure so only the center 9% of the scene as shown in the viewfinder is metered.

AE lock can be a very useful technique when you want to be sure that one part of a scene is exposed correctly. For example, if you photograph a barn in the middle of a snow-covered landscape, the image will most likely be underexposed and too dark because so much of the scene is white snow that the camera will capture as middle gray. However, using AE lock, you can move in on the barn so it fills the center 9% of the viewfinder and lock exposure. You can then move back to shoot the barn with the exposure you locked in from close up. When you do this focus is locked in from the actual shooting position. In other situations you may not move, just swing the camera slightly to lock exposure on one part of the scene and then recompose the image in the viewfinder before taking the picture.

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