Minimizing Red Eye in Your Photos

Red-eye is the phenomenon where people have glowing red eyes in photographs. This is caused by the close proximity of the flash (especially built-in flash) to the camera lens, which causes light from the subject to be reflected directly back at the camera. When the flash fires, the light reflects off the blood in the capillaries in the back of the subject's eyes and back into the camera lens. People with blue eyes are particularly susceptible to the red-eye phenomenon because they have less...

Digital Single Lens Reflex DSLR

This camera is named for the reflexing mirror that allows you to frame the image through the lens prior to capturing the image. As light passes through the DSLR camera's lens, it falls onto a reflexing mirror and then passes through a prism to the viewfinder. The viewfinder image corresponds to the actual image area. When the picture is taken, the mirror reflexes, or moves up and out of the way, allowing the open shutter to expose the digital image sensor, which captures the image. Most...

Bracketing the Exposure of an Image

Even careful metering sometimes yields an under- or overexposed image. This is why professional photographers bracket their images, whenever possible, to be absolutely sure they have a correctly exposed image. Bracketing involves taking three shots of the same image based on the aperture and shutter values recommended by the light meter one shot underexposed one stop, one shot at the recommended exposure, and one shot overexposed one stop. Shooting the image with a range of three exposure stops...

Understanding Lens Multiplication with DSLRs

Most interchangeable lenses were originally created and rated for the 35 mm film plane of traditional SLRs. If you compare the area of a 35 mm film plane with the area of most digital image sensors' image planes, you'll see that the area of most digital image sensors is a bit smaller. The focal length of a lens changes when it is put on a DSLR with a digital image sensor smaller than 35 mm. This smaller image plane effectively increases the focal length of the lens because more of the image...

Depth of Field

Depth of field is the area of the image that appears in focus from foreground to background and is determined by a combination of the opening of the aperture and the focal length of the lens. A small aperture setting results in greater depth of field. Controlling depth of field is one of the easiest ways for a photographer to compose the image. By limiting the depth of field of an image, the photographer can turn the attention of the viewer on the subject in focus. Often, limiting the depth of...