Sharpening Tools

Possibly because Aperture and other tools provide more than one way of doing it, sharpening is a process which is often not very well understood. Though it's not a common misconception among photographers, it's worth clarifying that sharpening is not intended to fix images that are out of focus. Digital image editors, Aperture included, provide a wealth of tools for fixing exposure problems but, if your images are out of focus, you're out of luck and those shots are destined for the reject...

Dng Profile Support Aperture

If your camera Raw format is not supported by Aperture, one way around the issue is to convert the Raw files to Adobe DNG format. DNG is a Raw format published by Adobe in the hope of creating a single industry standard and open Raw format as an alternative to the multitude of proprietary Raw formats currently in existence. One advantage of this for developers of software that works with camera Raw files is that it would not be necessary to add support for new formats each time a new camera...

The Pros and Cons of a Raw Workflow

More and more professional photographers are realizing the benefits of shooting Raw as opposed to TIFF or JPEG. The fact that many dSLRs now provide the option of saving both types of file from a single shot gives you the option of producing a just in case' Raw file. It may be thatyour usual workflow involves Fig. 1.3 Support for new camera Raw formats is provided in the MacOs operating system. Owners of newer digital cameras like the Canon EOS-1DS Mark III, which was launched in August 2007,...

Aperture and Adobe Bridge

The advantages of using Aperture over a Bridge ACR workflow are numerous. Aperture's organizational tools and versioning system make it easier to keep track of your images and edited Versions, take up much less disk space and, ultimately, help you work faster than a system which relies on producing multiple RGB files for each edited Version of an image. You'll also find locating images within a large Library much faster using Aperture. Suppose you want to produce two Versions of the same Raw...

Importing Your iPhoto Library

When you first open Aperture, a dialog boxappears thatallows you to import your iPhoto Library. If you decide to import your iPhoto Library after you've been using Aperture for a while, select File gt Import gt iPhoto Library Fig. 7.1 . Use the Store Files pop-up menu to tell Aperture where you want to store the imported image files.'In the Aperture Library'will copy the files from the iPhoto Library to the Aperture Library. If you have a large iPhoto Library you'll need to consider the storage...

Selecting and Displaying Images Using the Viewer Toolbar

Organize Aperture Library

The Viewer Toolbar sits just below the main area for displaying your images. It is split equally between editing tools and viewing tools. The former, which sit at the left-hand end of the bar, lets you straighten, rotate and crop your images, and perform some of the simpler traditional 'editing' techniques, which in many cases are duplicated in the Adjustments Inspector. The latter, which sits at the right-hand end, controls how your images are displayed Fig. 2.15 . The first ofthese buttons,...

Creating Your First Vault

Vaults are managed through their own panel at the bottom of the Aperture Inspector. Expand it by clicking the Show or Hide Vaults button at the bottom of the interface Q . This opens a blank pane where your Vaults will be organized. Connect an external drive to any one of your Mac's available ports and then click the Shortcuts button the cog beside the show Vaults button and choose Add Vault, then navigate to the newly attached drive Figs 3.20 and 3.21 . Once added, the drive will show as a...

Managing Color

Photos, in whatever medium, are merely representations of light and color in a scene. To get the most out of Aperture, therefore, it is critical that you set it up to best reproduce these tones on screen, and when outputting your work. Mac OS X manages color using ColorSync, an operating system level function that translates the colors captured and displayed by components of your set-up - including cameras, monitors, and printers - so that they can be universally understood. This is important...

Sharpening

Next on the Raw Fine Tuning brick are two sliders which control sharpening. The sharpening adjustments on the Raw Fine Tuning brick are designed specifically to compensate for softening of the image which occurs as a result of the demosaicing process. Like the other Raw Fine Tuning adjustments, Sharpening is applied on the basis of the camera model characteristics - different Fig. 1.20 The Version on the left has the default Boost adjustment of 1.0 on the right this has been reduced to 0.5. For...

Perform Your First Backup

Now that your images are in Aperture, and before deleting them from your memory card, you should perform a backup. If you chose to store your images in the Aperture Library, rather than referencing them from elsewhere on your hard drive, you should use the Vaults system by opening the Vaults panel at the foot of the Inspector and connecting an external hard drive by either FireWire or USB. If you have already set up a Vault on this drive, Aperture will recognize it and mount it automatically....

Choosing Where to Store Your Images

Whenever you import an image to the Library from another location on your Mac or network, you have the option of adding it to your local Aperture Library or leaving it in its original location. Your choice will largely depend on how the image is used. If you work alone, then there is no problem with moving it to your local drive, but users on a network should be careful here, as changing its location could make it unavailable to others on the network. You can, however, change the location of...

Moving Libraries

By default, your Aperture Library is stored in the Pictures folder of your user account. It is a package called Aperture Library, the contents of which can be viewed by right-clicking and picking Show Package Contents. You should never mess with this Package's contents, but you can safely move it wholesale to another location on your Mac, or to an external drive connected by FireWire or USB. This is particularly important when you have been using Aperture for some time and your Managed Library...

Digital Masters and Versions

Every photo you import into Aperture is a Digital Master. Regardless of the format, it is considered sacred within the application and will never be touched by any of the editing tools at your disposal. Even cropped images still exist in their original format in the directory structure we described above so that should you suffer a serious drive corruption after which Aperture can no longer open your Library itself, you can still go back and manually copy the images yourself. This assumes, of...

The Adjustment HUD Brick by Brick

Aside from the image itself, the Histogram provides more information about digital image tonal and color quality than Fig. 5.6 The Histogram can be configured from the Adjustments Action pop-up menu to display luminance a overlayed red, green and blue channels b or individual red here color channels c . When the cursor is positioned over the image the RGB values of the underlying pixels are displayed, otherwise camera Exif data is shown d . Fig. 5.6 The Histogram can be configured from the...

Restoring Your Library from a Vault

With any luck, you will never need to restore your Library from a Vault. If you do, it usually means you have suffered a serious internal hard drive failure. Fortunately, if you have been keeping your Vaults up to date, you should be able to recover all of your work, except that which you have done since your last backup which really should be no more than a day . If you ensure that you do not delete your photos from your memory card before they are stored in a Vault, you should be able to...

Tinting

Aperture has two tint adjustments - Sepia Tone and Color Monochrome. Sepia Tone is little more than a single tint version of Color Monochrome. You can do everything Sepia Tone does, and more using Color Monochrome so, other than including an example of what Sepia Tone does, we'll concentrate on Color Monochrome. To add a Color Monochrome adjustment select it from the Add Adjustment pop-up menu. There are only two controls a color swatch and an intensity slider. The default color is sepia and...

Transferring Your Library to a New

You can also resort to your Vaults to transfer your Library to a new Mac. This is a fine solution if, when importing your photos into your Library, you transfer them wholesale into Aperture's directory structure. If you instead leave them in referenced locations, such as a folder elsewhere on your drive, or a different drive entirely, however, they will not be stored in the Vault. In this case, restoring from a Vault would leave you with an incomplete Library, featuring any Versions you have...

Spot and Patch and Retouch

Repairing And Retouching Images

Aperture's retouching tools consist of the Spot and Patch tool and the Retouch tool. Both are essentially clone tool variants and can be used to retouch blemishes such as sensor dust spots and skin blemishes and for basic cloning operations. Spot and Patch was introduced in Aperture 1.0 and superseded by the more capable Retouch tool in Aperture 2. The Spot and Patch tool has been retained for reasons of backward compatibility. Aperture 2 allows you to work with images that were previously...

How Aperture Stores Your Images

Aperture stores all of your images in its Library. Under the hood, this is a complex collection of folders, sub-folders, packaged files and original images, accompanied by thumbnails, previews and metadata files describing how they should be organized and what changes you have made to them. At a system level - on your hard drive - your images are organized in a complex series of embedded folders hidden inside a package in your Pictures folder called Aperture Library. Double-clicking this will...

Vignette and Devignette

A vignette is an image that fades or darkens at the edges. The term is widely used to describe any image with a soft-edged border, but Aperture's Vignette adjustment produces a more subtle effect that fades from the center becoming darker at the edges. This simulates an effect common in early photography Fig. 5.23 Aperture's new Vignette adjustment is a subtle affair. The Gamma Version shown here produces a more pronounced effect than the alternative, Exposure, which reproduces the kind of...

Keywords Overview

More than any other kind of metadata, keywords define the content of your images and help you locate them. Effective keywording of your images can make the difference between finding the perfect shot for a job or page upon page of also-rans. More importantly, it can mean finding the shot you know you have within a couple of seconds, as opposed to spending hours in a tedious trawl through folder upon folder of the wrong stuff. You might think that applying keywords to images is something that...

Introduction

One of Aperture's biggest assets is that it gives you the ability to work with Raw images without converting them to other formats. At the end of this process, if you want to use the output images in other applications, on the Web, or in commercially printed publications for example, Aperture's Raw decoder can convert the Raw files into TIFF, JPEG and other image file formats. You can, of course, use Aperture in a non-Raw workflow to organize and edit TIFF or JPEG files from your camera, but...

Using DNG Converter

DNG converter is a free download available from www.adobe.com products dng . All the conversion options are provided from a single panel divided into four numbered sections. The first two of these are used to select the images you want to convert and specify a destination folder and file naming options. Specify a separate location for the converted DNG files Fig. 1.23 . Depending on your archival requirements you may want to archive the original Raw files to a removable or separate disk. Panel...

The Version 20 Decoder

The Version 2.0 decoder adds a Hue Boost slider under the Boost slider Fig. 1.19 . This is used to maintain the hue values in an image as the contrast is increased. Higher Hue Boost settings cause color in the image to shift more as the Boost slider is increased. At lower Hue Boost settings, boost has less of an effect on color values in the image. In practise, high Hue Boost settings work well for images with saturated primary and secondary colors, like flowers. You can use lower Hue Boost...

Ken McMahon Nik Rawlinson

Amsterdam Boston Heidelberg London New York Oxford Paris San Diego San Francisco Singapore Sydney Tokyo Focal Press is an imprint of Elsevier This book is dedicated to Rich from Nik Focal Press is an imprint of Elsevier Linacre House, Jordan Hill, Oxford OX2 8DP, UK 30 Corporate Drive, Suite 400, Burlington, MA 01803, USA Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means...