B

FIGURE 5-1 High-oblique views showing the horizon in (A) tilted and (B) level positions. The latter is preferred in nearly all situations. Red Hills, Kansas, United States. Kite aerial photos by SWA, June 2006.

FIGURE 5-2 Two high-oblique views of the Danish landscape. A prehistoric wall, Ramme Dige, crosses the left side of scene, and wind turbines are visible in the background. (A) Ideal rule of thirds for horizon position. (B) Horizon positioned only one-tenth of the distance from the top. The latter is preferred for most SFAP applications, as the sky adds little to appreciation of the scene. Kite aerial photos by IM, SWA, and JSA, September 2005.

FIGURE 5-2 Two high-oblique views of the Danish landscape. A prehistoric wall, Ramme Dige, crosses the left side of scene, and wind turbines are visible in the background. (A) Ideal rule of thirds for horizon position. (B) Horizon positioned only one-tenth of the distance from the top. The latter is preferred for most SFAP applications, as the sky adds little to appreciation of the scene. Kite aerial photos by IM, SWA, and JSA, September 2005.

This happens because we are accustomed to illuminate whatever we work at from an opposite position, not from behind our elbow. Positioning the light source to the lower right, so that shadows are cast toward the top or left side of view leads to a well-known optical trick, in which the terrain appears to have inverted relief (Fig. 5-3). To avoid this misinterpretation, rotate the image so that shadows are cast toward the lower right direction.

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